A New Friend for Sofindja

By: Kervens Fils-Aime, Community Engagement Assistant

Sofindja is a very smart and cheerful little girl who lives in a small community in Haiti. She is the eldest of two children and has participated in sponsorship programs for three years. For the first two years, she regularly exchanged correspondence with her sponsor.  However, the sponsor was no longer able to continue the sponsorship, causing the friendship to come to an end.  Although Sofindja was disappointed, she looked forward to starting up again with someone new.

While she waited to be connected to a new sponsor, she enjoyed reading the letters her friends received from their sponsors, an activity that allowed her some connection to her old routine that she missed so much.

One day, at the end of 2018, a field agent came bearing good news. Sofindja was finally getting a new sponsor!  Even her good grades from the quarter did not make her happier than this news! The long awaited exchange was finally going to start again, and Sofindja was getting a new friend.

 I was so happy to finally be able to talk to my new friend, she exclaimed. “I sent him some information about meI told him that I have a little brother, and I made him a nice drawing of a flower. I hope we will get along well, because he is a boy and I love soccer like many boys. 

Sofindja chatting with a Save the Children field agent

Every day, sponsors make a tremendous difference in children’s lives, and exchanging letters is just one part of the program.  For example, Sofindja and her schoolmates also enjoy important life-changing benefits – from the construction and restorations of schools and play areas, to the implementation of important health and hygiene programs. Thanks to our partnership with Save the Children, this school has been totally renovated and we now have a playground that all the children can use during recess,” explains Sofindja’s school principal. The children love playing outdoors and this allows them to take a break, every day! They now also have access to a handwashing station that they can use to help them stay healthy.”

Sofindja using the new hand washing station at her school

Sponsorship offers a window to life in a different country, and can be a rewarding experience for both parties. Thank you for committing to making Sofindja — and many children around the world — smile daily!

Recycling for Change in Haiti’s Camps

RSZDCROPMichele062007_Adv #54 Michele Beauvoir Chandler, Save the Children Haiti, deputy director of human resources 

Port-au-Prince, Haiti

September 7, 2010


Youth living in camps in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, held an art expo last Friday, September 3.  This was no ordinary art show – these children were demonstrating how they can take what others view as waste and not only turn it into art, but also turn it into a livelihood.

IMG_4200 Maxon Aubourg, 15, demonstrated the skills he learned through creating a handbag out of recycled candy wrappers from the Archachon 34 camp.  “This can help us in the future because we can show how waste can be used,” says Maxon.

After thorough cleaning, children participating in Save the Children’s Water, Sanitiation and Hygiene Promotion programs take waste materials like plastic bags and candy wrappers and weave them into handbags, picture frames and bracelets. Additionally, they create garbage cans out of plastic bottles that are placed throughout the camp to promote more hygienic living conditions.

IMG_4199 Nicolas Louis, 17,  presents the garbage cans he created for the Ste. Therese camp

At the expo on Friday, children and youth displayed their items for sale, engaged in workshops about their rights and learned how to treat water so that it is safe to drink.

IMG_4214 Youth from three Port-au-Prince camps participate in activities including songs that teach them about their rights

Items were available for sale at the Save the Children Port-au-Prince office, with the proceeds going towards the programs so the youth could continue to create their art and learn innovative ways of waste management.


IMG_4190 The variety of items on sale included handbags, placemats, visors, sandals and picture frames

“One of the most incredible results of this program has been the way it has impacted entire camp communities,” says Maude Marie Sanon, a Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Coordinator with Save the Children in Haiti.  “Save the Children no longer provides garbage cans – the camps are creating them for themselves out of recycled materials.”

IMG_4196

Maude proudly displays the items made by children living in three of Port-au-Prince’s camps