What Makes Sponsorship Special to You?

Karisten StrongKaristen Strong, Sponsorship Marketing Associate

Westport, CT

Wednesday, September 1, 2010  

 When you sponsor children through Save the Children, you have the unique chance to change lives and to build relationships with girls and boys in need. One New Jersey family has made sponsorship an integral part of their lives. Kim, Tom, and their daughter Felicity sponsor four children from Egypt, Mali, Nepal, and Haiti.  

The best thing about sponsorship is that the family is connected to the Felicity 2world around them. Kim noted that it allows them to support Save the Children’s programs that work to impact lives and build strong communities. She realizes it takes time to achieve sustainable changes and sponsorship allows her family to remain engaged through these community transformations.   

Felicity, 11, raised over $3,000 in February for Save the Children’s relief efforts in Haiti by selling cookies and she is currently raising funds for our relief efforts for children affected by the flooding in Pakistan through selling pins.  


Kim and Tom instilled their passion for sponsorship in their daughter at a young age. Felicity began writing to her family’s sponsored children when she was just 6. She was encouraged to write to their sponsored  girl in Mali named Korotoumou when she began learning French. Felicity now writes to her family’s sponsored children monthly. “I am very happy and excited when I get a letter,” Felicity says.


Felicity 1
“I’m interested to find out what they are doing, about their cultures and what has happened since I last heard from them—it’s wonderful!” 

In their letters, they share what they are learning in school, stories about their families and pets, and about their favorite activities. 

Felicity’s advice for letter writing—keep it simple! Felicity understands the importance of being involved in sponsorship. She says, “You have to start young and take the time to be part of the close relationship you can gain from giving to others.”   

What makes sponsorship special to you? We’d love to hear from you!

From Tsunami to Earthquake – An Inspiring Story of Cross Cultural Compassion


Charlie Charles MacCormack, Save the Children president and CEO

Westport, Connecticut
August  20, 2010

Sometimes it is those who have experienced hardship and loss themselves who are the ones who reach out to others in times of tragedy.  This is definitely the case for the students of UNSYIAH Laboratory School, a model community school established in 2007 in Banda Aceh, Indonesia, designed to educate the students from the areas severely damaged by the 2004 earthquake and tsunami.  

Following the news of the earthquake in Haiti, the students of the UNSYIAH Laboratory School held several events to raise funds for the victims in Haiti.  

Washing bike

For two weeks in mid-January of this year, they prepared and sold food and beverages to their fellow classmates, organized a charity car and motorcycle wash, volunteered as parking lot attendants and set out collection boxes on the streets of Banda Aceh to raise money from area residents. 
Donation box

The school’s senior class presented the funds to Save the Children as their class gift during the graduation ceremony this year, requesting that the money be used to help school children impacted by the Haiti earthquake. 

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Click here to learn how you can fundraise for Save the Children in your community.

“If Education Can Still Go Forward, Haiti Has a Chance”


Susan-Warner-in-Haiti-2010 Susan Warner-Lambert
Manager of Photography

June 28th, 2010

Port-au-Prince, Haiti

I recently returned from my first trip to Haiti. I took the photo below at the École Eddy Pascal School in Port-au-Prince. Their school building was destroyed in the January 12th earthquake. With the help of Save the Children, the school is now set up in several tents.

I chose to highlight this picture from their recess activities because I like the action and composition, but also because it represents to me what is right about Haiti. There is so much needed in infrastructure and resources, but as long as education can still go forward for the next generation, then Haiti has a chance.

I encourage you to post your comments and/or questions!

Haiti jump roping


Photo credit: Susan Warner – Save the Children 2010

Learn more about our emergency response to the earthquake in Haiti.

Hope in Haiti: ‘Miracle Baby’ Winnie Update

RSZDCROPMichele062007_Adv #54 Michele Beauvoir Chandler, Save the Children Haiti, deputy director of human resources 

Port-au-Prince, Haiti

May 18, 2010

Three days after the devastating earthquake in Haiti, a tiny 2-year-old girl named Winnie was pulled from the rubble by an Australian TV crew. At the time, Save the Children medical staff treated her and determined that despite suffering from dehydration, she would recover.

Four months later, I am thrilled to report that Winnie is doing quite well. She is living with her Uncle Frantz and Aunt Gertrude in Port-au-Prince. Her uncle says that she is beginning to talk and is becoming less timid. Winnie will be celebrating her third birthday on June 26.

Click here to view a slideshow of Winnie's miraculous recovery.

Learn more about our emergency response to the earthquake in Haiti.

Help Us Respond to the Haiti Earthquake Emergency. Please Donate Now.

YOU CAN DONATE $10 TO THE HAITI EARTHQUAKE RELIEF FUND BY TEXTING “SAVE” to 20222 (US Only). Standard message rates  apply. 

Moving Day in Haiti: Jean Steve Finds a New Home at Corail Cesselesse Camp

When the opportunity to move out of one of Port-au-Prince’s largest settlements for displaced families arose, Jean Steve’s parents knew it was time to go.

The family of four, made homeless by the January 12 earthquake, has been living at the Petionville Club, a massive camp of at least 43,000 people located on a 9-hole golf course. The site is overcrowded and perched on the steep hills, threatened by flooding and landslides now that rainy season has begun with near-daily downpours.

SC_AZ07

Kate Conradt, Save the Children director, media and communications

Petionville Club Camp

Port-au-Prince, Haiti

April 15, 2010



When the opportunity to move out of one of Port-au-Prince’s largest settlements for displaced families arose, Jean Steve’s parents knew it was time to go.

The family of four, made homeless by the January 12 earthquake, has been living at the Petionville Club, a massive camp of at least 43,000 people located on a 9-hole golf course. The site is overcrowded and perched on the steep hills, and it is threatened by flooding and landslides now that the near-daily downpours of the rainy season have begun.

Familyrelocate-0193 An emergency evacuation of people living in at-risk areas began April 10, and Jean Steve, his brother, Romario, and his parents, Alexis and Sagine, opted to go to a new camp established north of Port-au-Prince at Corail Cesselesse. The family is pictured at right. (Photo credit: Lee Celano/Getty Images)

They were among the first 20 families to move.

“It was really bad here. We had a lot of problems. The rain came into our tent and we couldn’t sleep,” said Alexis.

“We knew we couldn’t live here anymore,” said Sagine.

The family registered and moved to the new site on April 11. The planned camp has neatly spaced tents on a graveled plain. Save the Children set up a clinic and child-friendly spaces before the new residents arrived. Pictured below are Alexis and Sagine, along with Jean Steve, as they load supplies into their new tent. (Photo credit: Lee Celano/Getty Images)   

Loadtentrelocate-0264 “This place is better,” said 9-year-old Jean Steve. “There’s no mud here. And my friends are coming.”

A third-grader and fan of the Brazilian national soccer team, Jean Steve was going to school before the earthqake. He has not been back to class since he lost his home. His eyes light up when he hears that schools, too, will come to the camp.

“I like school,” he said.

Save the Children is providing vital services for children like Jean Steve and Romario during the relocation process. Working with the Haitian Scouts, from registration to arrival, our staff will inform and keep families together as they travel.

The agency’s child-friendly spaces (for children and youth) at Corail Cesselesse will provide activities to help Jean Steve, Romario, and hundreds of other children maintain a normal routine, as well as provide informal education activities while schools come on line.

Save the Children also will register children for school, train teachers and provide them with education supplies.

Learn more about our emergency response to the earthquake in Haiti.

Help Us Respond to the Haiti Earthquake Emergency. Please Donate Now.

YOU CAN DONATE $10 TO THE HAITI EARTHQUAKE RELIEF FUND BY TEXTING “SAVE” to 20222 (US Only). Standard message rates  apply.  

President Preval of Haiti Visits Save the Children’s Medical Clinic

President Preval of Haiti visits Save the Children’s Medical Clinic and meets the staff.

Kathryn BollesHeadshotKathryn Bolles, Save the Children's director, emergency health and nutrition 

Petionville Club Camp, Medical Clinic

Port-au-Prince, Haiti

April 10, 2010

This morning, the first population movement left Petionville Club and relocated to Corail. Of the original 200 planned for the first day, only approximately 60 families made it out. Tomorrow, 800 persons are scheduled to move in scheduled convoys starting at 7.30 am.>

A group of us went to the  Petionville Club camp to observe the registration and protection activities, and saw a line of approximately 250-300 people waiting at the registration table–they had chosen the Corail option.

Our protection staff left at 6 am this morning to set up two Child Friendly Spaces tents a bit down from the reception area (they were the nicest and most welcoming tents in the place), and our health and nutrition clinics staff set up two tents for the medical clinic at the reception area.

President Preval arrived unexpectedly and shortly after the first buses, at approximately 3 pm. He walked around the camp with the Petionville Camp leader, Pastor St-Cyr, and came to our medical clinic.

A group photo is at right with Dr. Frantz Codio (our clinic team leader on the left), President Preval (middle), and Pastor St Cyr (right).

RZDPres.Preval

The Pastor told President Preval that Save the Children has been providing  medical care to the people in Petionville Club since the first earthquake struck on Jan. 12, and that we work all day, 6 days a week. President Preval thanked our team for our good work and asked us to please continue.

Pictured below are the medical team including me. We're ready and waiting for the people to arrive.

DSCMEDTEAMBOLLESRZD_0615

The area is desolate, incredibly hot, and like a desert with dust blowing all around. UN bulldozers were working, 2 water bladders were filled and a few latrines were set up.

Reception area tents were very well-organized and color-coded, and large-font instructions in Creole informed arrivees on how to find the medical tent, and that each family will have help setting up their personal tents and will receive food and a hygiene kit.

I’m sure this scene will look much different in 5 days.

Learn more about our emergency response to the earthquake in Haiti.

Help Us Respond to the Haiti Earthquake Emergency. Please Donate Now.

YOU CAN DONATE $10 TO THE HAITI EARTHQUAKE RELIEF FUND BY TEXTING “SAVE” to 20222 (US Only). Standard message rates  apply.  

Back to School: Children Attend First Temporary School Set Up By Save the Children Post Earthquake

Sarah_tyler Sarah Tyler, Save the Children, emergency communications manager

Port-au-Prince, Haiti

March 9, 2010




At Cejecodema school, Jimmy, 10, clutches his new notebook and pencils close to his chest. Today is the first day he has returned to school since the earthquake on Jan. 12, 2010 turned his life upside down.

Jimmy1aJimmy is just one of many children in this poor community in Martissant, an area of Port-au-Prince, who have the opportunity to return to classes because of Save the Children.

“I like to study and I want to learn,” he said. (Pictured at right: Jimmy waiting for school to begin. Photo Credit: Rebecca Janes/ Save the Children).

In Martissant, where the earthquake destroyed many homes and buildings, large tents ensure that children can continue their education, play and interact with each other in a safe environment.

“My school fell in the quake but I don’t want to go back to it because I am afraid to have concrete over my head,” said Jimmy. “I like this space because it is outside. I feel safe here.”

Over the coming weeks, Save the Children plans to construct about 300 safe, temporary classrooms to help vulnerable children in earthquake-torn areas. This would include repairing some less damaged structures. Pictured below are some Martissant buildings that were destroyed by the earthquake (Photo Credit: Rebecca Janes / Save the Children).

Tents1This disaster has compounded already daunting educational challenges facing Haiti, where only 51 percent of children attended school before the earthquake and where, on average, children only complete four years of schooling. 

To ensure that children continue to have access to education, Save the Children plans to work with government, private and community schools alike.

At Cejecodema, Jimmy says he will study hard to be a mechanic. 

“I want to learn how to fix things so I can be helpful to my family and the community,” he said.

Help Us Respond to the Haiti Earthquake Emergency. Please Donate Now.

YOU CAN DONATE $10 TO THE HAITI EARTHQUAKE RELIEF FUND BY TEXTING “SAVE” to 20222 (US Only).

Learn more about our emergency response to the earthquake in Haiti.

An Orphaned Boy Finds a New Home at a Haitian Community School

L_65522[1] Laurent Duvillier, Save the Children manager, media and communications

Port-au-Prince, Haiti

March 2, 2010

3-year-old Joseph was buried in debris when his aunt, Immalula Bordeau, age 22, rescued him alive. He lost both parents in the earthquake.

 “Every time Joseph hears a helicopter, he gets scared,” said Immalula. “It reminds him the sound of the earthquake.”

IMG_8620_65641[1] Today, Joseph is learning and playing with other children in a community school supported by Save the Children. He is pictured at right, learning at school on Feb. 17, 2010. (Photo credit: Louise Dyring)

Perched high on the hills above Port-au-Prince, the Bazilo Community School stands amid the devastated neighborhood of Carrefour-Feuille. The Haitian Ministry of Education has yet to assess if the building is safe.

In the meantime, classes continue on this steep slope under the open sky.

Every inch of flat space is used to work on the alphabet, review multiplication tables or practice writing. No walls separate the classes, which serve 120 children between the ages of 3 and 12.

Despite the shortages, the teachers and children look happy to be back on the learning track again.

Parents have brought their children en masse to Bazilo school. And not simply for an education.

IMG_8641_65649[1] Bazilo has become a 24/7 community-based care center, an invaluable resource for kids like Joseph. (Pictured at left, Joseph playing with a friend at Bazilo. Feb 17, 2010. Photo credit: Louise Dyring)

 “As long as he can play with other kids, Joseph is happy. He makes a lot of friends at school,” said Immalula, who has been caring for him. “It is good to start education as early as possible. Other schools are too far or too expensive. We simply cannot afford it.”

Every night, Immalula and Joseph — and about 50 others — cram themselves in a flimsy collective tent that rests on a tiny plateau on the edge of the cliff above the school.

“It is not easy but now we know each other. We have become like a big family,” says Immalula.

Save the Children has distributed educational materials (including pencils, notebooks, stationery supplies and toys) and tarps to the school. Prior to the earthquake, the school was supported by the agency’s “Rewrite the Future” campaign.

Teachers will receive additional training in responding to children’s emotional and social needs and helping mitigate future disaster risks.

Save the Children is also facilitating the Ministry of Education’s efforts to inspect and certify the remaining schools in the affected areas of Port-au-Prince.

Help Us Respond to the Haiti Earthquake Emergency. Please Donate Now.

YOU CAN DONATE $10 TO THE HAITI EARTHQUAKE RELIEF FUND BY TEXTING “SAVE” to 20222 (US Only).

Learn more about our emergency response to the earthquake in Haiti.

A Video of Save the Children’s Mobile Health Team in Haiti

Tanya_weinberg Tanya Weinberg, Save the Children manager, media and communications

Port-au-Prince, Haiti

February 26, 2010

In the video below, you can see what it’s really like on the ground as we videotape the work of a Save the Children mobile health team in Haiti. The team arrives in a crowded camp called Village Gastron Magron in Port-Au-Prince on Feb. 22, 2010.

The video features Dr. Joachim Abdias on-camera who is treating patients and explaining their medical conditions. 


Help Us Respond to the Haiti Earthquake Emergency. Please Donate Now.

YOU CAN DONATE $10 TO THE HAITI EARTHQUAKE RELIEF FUND BY TEXTING “SAVE” to 20222 (US Only).

The Incredible Resilience of Children

Tanya_weinberg Tanya Weinberg, Save the Children manager, media and communications

Port-au-Prince, Haiti

February 24, 2010

Today, as I took a break from a visit to a Save the Children medical clinic in a sprawling tent city that has replaced a posh golf club, a group of smiling, delightful children came to pay me a visit.

Blog photo by Suma Suresh Kids from 8 to 17 wanted to try out their English with me and were patient enough to try and teach me some Creole. Pictured at right, the children help me with my language skills. (Photo credit: Suma Suresh)

They howled with laughter when I made faces of despair at my inability to catch on, but were so polite and considerate as I tried again.

One 17-year-old boy took out the English/Creole picture dictionary he carried in his backpack to teach me more. He would not be going back to school because his school was gone, he told me. “I really want to keep studying,” he said. “But I can’t.”

I think we jointly decided not to dwell on it as smiles started to slip away, because everybody wanted to continue with the fun.

The day before, I was overwhelmed by the joy and laughter and singing of children at one of Save the Children’s Child Friendly Spaces.  This, too, was in the middle of a tent city, where children lived with their surviving relatives but with very few of the comforts of home.

I can’t remember the last time I saw such exuberance. The kids shouted out lyrics in response to one of the community volunteer’s calls as they jumped, jumped, jumped along to the rhythm of the song.

Then it was time for sack races, in which kids shrieked with delight and hoisted the winner to their shoulders like he’d just scored the winning goal at the World Cup.

The Child Friendly Spaces allow kids a chance to be kids again. The kids can have fun, express themselves, and look forward to a nice routine amidst the upheaval of their lives.

It’s incredible how children can bounce back from terrible experiences if they have the right opportunities.

Help Us Respond to the Haiti Earthquake Emergency. Please Donate Now.

YOU CAN DONATE $10 TO THE HAITI EARTHQUAKE RELIEF FUND BY TEXTING “SAVE” to 20222 (US Only).