Kindness in the Classroom

By: Nimma Adhikari, Sponsorship Communication Coordinator

My first visit to Kapilvastu, Nepal, was back in 2013 when I had accompanied my then supervisor to meet sponsored children in schools supported by Save the Children’s Sponsorship Program. Of those schools, some had very small classrooms for a large volume of students, while others did not have enough students. Some were undergoing construction building new classrooms, early learning centers and age-appropriate water taps. This was the fourth year of Save the Children programs in Kapilvastu. 

Fast forward to 2019, and I meet 14-year-old Goma, a grade eight student in one of the schools we work at in Kapilvastu. She remembers how she and her friends studied in cramped classrooms when she was in her primary school. They did not have enough classrooms to house all the students comfortably, and on top of that, most teachers walked around with sticks in their hands reminding them to behave. Learning was not much fun for Goma and her siblings. It was a task that she did to please her parents — especially her father who had a brief career as a teacher but had settled as a farmer.  

“Many years ago, a bunch of people had come to take our photos. Soon after, I received a letter from someone who I was told was my friend from Italy. Her name is Paola,” shares Goma who first started participating in Save the Children’s sponsorship program in 2014. “My school is much better now and so are my teachers,” she continues, “especially Lila ma’am and Sushil sir. They teach us Nepali and math.”

Goma playing her favorite game, football, with a school friend

Trained by Save the Children, the teachers in Goma’s school gain the trust of students by being polite, attentive, and responsive to their questions and individual needs in class. Discarding all forms of corporal punishment are some important lessons given to teachers during teacher trainings. “Lila ma’am asks us several questions before starting her lessons. Once she starts the lesson, we realize the questions are related to the current chapter. This helps us remember and understand important points made in the chapter,” explains Goma. In addition to that, Lila and other teachers in Goma’s school make sure they connect with their students by sharing interesting general knowledge they have learned.

Goma sitting outside her school

Goma adds that Save the Children programs, as well as her sponsor Paola’s kind advice to study well and take care of her health, motivated her to become a doctor in the future. “Knowing about her concern for me, it feels like she is my sister even though I have never met her.”

This was probably one of my last visits to Kapilvastu, as Save the Children will hand over the programs for continuation to the community and local government agencies by early 2020. Save the Children has now moved to other impoverished areas in the Mahottari and Sarlahi districts where lack of quality education and basic health facilities, as well as child marriage are just a few of the greater challenges for children.