Save the Children U.S. Programs

Summer Boost Helps Kids Stay on Track

By Julia Morledge, age 15

Julia sponsors Emil, age 6

Edited by Jenée Tonelli, Sponsorship Communications Specialist

 

At 15 years old, my family has been sponsoring through Save the Children longer than I’ve been alive.  I’ve written to children over the years and received their letters and drawings in return, but have always wondered more about my sponsored child!  So, it was very exciting when my family and I visited the Save the Children Summer Programs in Tennessee.  Being from New England, it was so great to see what daily life was like for kids in rural, southern America!

The Save the Children Programs help to keep kids on track with their learning over the summer to make sure they don’t fall behind while school is out. My family and I sponsor because we have always believed that reading is especially important for these kids to learn, as our current society requires literacy to be successful.

One large goal of the program was to make reading fun for these kids. Everything they did with the kids was learning disguised as fun, which was really amazing to see. Before going out to see the programs, I was expecting a generic type of daycare for parents to drop their kids off while they worked. However, these kids were having a great time participating in all of the fun activities Save the Children had to offer while learning at the same time.

I was also so happy to see there was a connection between the staff and the kids that seemed to drive them to want to learn and accomplish more. For many of these kids, the Save the Children staff are their number one supporters.

Julia reads with Lareina in her home as part of the Early Steps to School Success program

I’m more convinced than ever that every one of us has the power to make a difference in this world, and by investing in our young generations and teaching them how to become ambitious learners, we are investing in the future. Save the Children provides support to these kids and gives them the tools to help both themselves and those around them.

Something that I take for granted are the many supporters surrounding me, constantly pushing me and wanting me to succeed in life. After seeing many children who didn’t have much or any support at home, I could see clearly that Save the Children was providing much needed support for all of these kids. With just one group of cheerleaders, my sponsored child is being given the opportunity to break the poverty cycle and seek a better life for himself.

I’ll never forget how inspired I felt watching these kids develop a passion for learning! It gave me hope for the future of our world.

Frustration and Optimism: My Mixed Emotions for Reducing Healthcare-associated Infections at Birth

This post is part of a series authored by the BASICS (Bold Action to Stop Infections in Clinical Settings) team. BASICS is a new initiative that will transform healthcare and reduce healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) by at least 50%.

Written by Wendy J. Graham
Professor of Obstetric Epidemiology, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology

Today, advances in healthcare routinely enable miracles of survival and recovery. But some discoveries have been forgotten or demoted in the race to implement the latest. The importance of hygiene at the time of birth goes back centuries.* Yet here in the 21st century, so-called “places of care” bring increased risks of infection to patients and health workers when basic preventive principles are not followed. Safe water to drink, a clean surface to deliver upon, and good hand hygiene by those attending you – how more basic can it be?

After nearly 40 years in public health, I am re-invigorated by the chance to be part of what the BASICS partnership proposes: integrating four agencies’ best practices and learning in infection prevention in healthcare settings into one systematic approach in partnership with countries to dramatically reduce infection rates at the point of care.

Health facilities – and especially maternity wards – are the natural environment of my interest and passion for change. Initial work in Botswana in the late 1970s and early 1980s – at the time when HIV/AIDS was just emerging, gave me a firm grounding in the tough realities of healthcare in under-resourced settings, together with a lifelong admiration for health workers who provide care 24/7 in such circumstances.

It’s in these maternity wards where many mothers and newborns acquire infections. They’re often busy and overcrowded places, with invasive procedures, instruments that may not be sterilized between use, and major infrastructural and supply challenges to maintaining cleanliness and hygiene. The photo here of a ward in West Africa captures this situation – indeed, with women being asked to bring their own bottle of bleach when they came to deliver as there had been no cleaning fluids in the maternity for months.

This is a striking reminder of the hidden costs of care families endure and the weakness in the health system, which means women deliver where “safe care” cannot be guaranteed and where health workers cannot protect themselves from infection risks either. Both “cannot’s” are violations of basic human rights.

This is why I’m so excited about the potential of BASICS to empower all health workers about proper hygiene and infection prevention practices and enable health systems to provide safe care equitably and routinely. And we mean “all” – acknowledging the crucial role in facilities played by workers who are not care practitioners – such as cleaners, orderlies and maintenance staff –  in creating a clean environment. These often-forgotten “workers for health” also have great potential to be agents for change.

But, of course, it’s not just the four BASICS collaborators and the crucial country partners who want better health outcomes for mothers and their newborns, and for them to leave a facility without a life-threatening infection.

Access to health facilities providing clean care was the second-highest demand of the 1.2 million women and girls in 114 countries who took part in the White Ribbon Alliance’s 2018 global What Women Want campaign on reproductive and maternal health needs. Women and girls overwhelmingly demanded clean facilities, clean toilets in maternity wards, a clean bed, and skilled health providers with sterile supplies and clean hands. 

None of these demands are impossible to achieve. The crucial innovation proposed by BASICS is to take the best evidence-based practices of each partner and create one comprehensive package of training, access to clean water in facilities, an innovative cleaning product and systems change in order to institutionalize and sustain clean care in the partner countries.

I am optimistic that BASICS can result in better quality healthcare that will save tens of thousands of lives and millions of dollars by averting healthcare-acquired infections.

In the time it has taken to read this, many more health workers’ could have washed their hands, many more women could have delivered on clean beds and with sterile instruments, and many more babies could have been discharged home without an infection from the facility. This advance does not require a new discovery – we know what to do now.

BASICS will be a catalyst for the miracle of survival and good health for mothers and newborns. 

To learn more about BASICS (Bold Action to Stop Infections in Clinical Settings) is a new initiative that will transform healthcare and reduce healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) by at least 50%, visit savethechildren.org.

 

*Graham WJ, Dancer SJ, Gould IM, Stones W. (2015) Childbed fever: history repeats itself? BJOG, 122:156–159.

Save the Children a Core Partner on $209 Million Contract to Advance Universal Health Coverage through the Development of Sustainable Systems for Health

Save the Children’s health breakthroughs depend on responsive, equitable, quality-focused health systems to carry out and integrate effective health interventions and sustain impact for the future. We have set the strengthening of systems for health as a strategic priority to help us ensure, by 2030, no child dies from preventable causes before their fifth birthday.

We are pleased to announce that Save the Children is one of four core partners of Abt Associates on a $209 million contract from the U.S. Agency for International Development to support scale up of quality reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health and nutrition services through the Achieving Sustainability through Local Health Systems activity. The five-year global project will:

  1. Reduce financial barriers to health services;
  2. Ensure equitable access for poor, underserved and socially excluded populations ; and
  3. Improve the quality of care for clients.

Save the Children will provide leadership to strengthen inclusive health system governance, engage civil society organizations to promote social accountability, enhance health systems at the community level, and sustainably scale up life-saving interventions. Our efforts will contribute to improved sustainability and resilience within health systems in as many at 52 countries to ensure mothers, newborns and children can access quality health services.

Additional partners include Institute for Healthcare Improvement, Training Resources Group and Results for Development, among a large consortium of deep expertise.