Photo credit: Ellery Lamm/Save the Children

Logging Reading Minutes with Save the Children’s 100 Days of Reading Campaign

Written by Sara Neumann, Director, Media & Communications, U.S. Programs 

 

Summer is my favorite season – more sunshine, time with family and friends, trips to the beach and of course, summer reading! I’ve always loved to read for pleasure – books can take you anywhere. I’m so excited that this summer, I can log my summer reading minutes as part of Save the Children’s 100 Days of Reading campaign and help children across rural America through September 8, World Literacy Day.

Literacy has always been a cornerstone of the programs we provide in the United States and around the world, and in celebration of our 100th anniversary, Save the Children has launched our inaugural summer reading campaign. Called Read A Story, Change Their Story, the campaign encourages all children, parents, teachers, librarians, caregivers, adults, and more to log their summer reading minutes at SavetheChildren.org/READ. Participants can positively impact the lives of children growing up in rural America who do not have adequate access to early learning or children’s books, while also promoting literacy in all communities.

The summer slide can affect any child, not just those growing up in poverty. Children’s summer learning experiences during their elementary school years can impact their success in higher grades, including whether they graduate from high school and even move onto college. Reading just 20 minutes a day can have tremendous impact on children – and adults – of all ages.

As a young girl, I loved the library and my elementary school librarian, Mrs. Pezzullo, in particular. She would always have a stack of recommendations waiting for my nearly daily trips. In fact, when I was little, a school librarian was my dream job. And last week, I was transported back to my elementary school days when my 6-year-old niece Lily pulled The Phantom Tollbooth off of my bookshelf. It was one of my most favorite books from childhood, but to re-read the classic alongside Lily has brought me such joy – and perspective – to talk about how we’re both imagining Milo and Tock’s trip to Dictionopolis and beyond. There were so many new words that we were inspired to buy Lily’s first children’s dictionary – my collegiate version was just a little complicated. She’s home now, but we’re continuing our adventure via FaceTime – we’re just arriving at Digitopolis with the Humbug in tow!

Reading is powerful. It changes lives. It grows minds. It informs you of the world around you, and helps you think differently, too. Since the campaign began, I’ve logged 4,400 minutes to help children in need. Will you join me?

Check out the incredible resources provided by our awesome partners – like coloring pages and reading lists and activities – to keep the fun going!