Nana Rouwaida’s Dreams

Author Portrait_Boubacar Abdoulkader, Education Supervisor
Boubacar Abdoulkader

Education Supervisor

Save the Children in Niger

September 16, 2017

In Tchadoua, a community in grassy flatlands in the southeastern part of Niger, the store houses are full of old millet stalks, a sign that the harvest has not met expectations this year. In this area, people live off agriculture – farming, herding and trading at a small scale. This lifestyle is often difficult as unpredictable weather patterns like drought, floods, or even locust attacks, cause unexpected challenges and hinder successful harvests. As a result, children are often involved in ensuring the family’s survival, expected to assist in bringing in an income rather than attending school.

Today it is sunny and windy, although it’s difficult to see with all the dust blowing in the air from the sandy ground in this area.

The school in Tchadoua is comprised of 5 small classrooms, among which one is made of concrete, two made of clay and the other two are simple sheds made of millet stalks and straw. The walls are bare and there are very few, if any, teaching materials to be seen.

Teachers here are very kind, they welcome us with cheers and friendly smiles. They are all very young, and most of them have not received any training on how to teach. Education in Niger is jeopardized by this, leading to a poor quality of education in schools and a very low level of pupils, as students have trouble staying engaged in lessons. One student out of ten in grade 4 can read the alphabet here.

Nana Rouwaida and friends Aicha and Fatchima after playing a round of chalele, a game involving dancing, clapping and signing.
Nana Rouwaida and friends Aicha and Fatchima after playing a round of chalele, a game involving dancing, clapping and signing.

Such is the setting where Save the Children now implements its sponsorship program. Among the children struggling to learn in Tchadoua is 11-year-old Nana Rouwaida, twelfth child born of a family of thirteen. She is always joyful and smiling. Neither her struggles in school or the difficulties of her family’s farming lifestyle prevented her from developing the dream to become a nurse one day.

This dream become even stronger when she was sponsored by Helen, her new friend in the United States, who helps support sponsorship programs in her community and also supports Nana Rouwaida through their letter writing, always encouraging her to work hard in school.

“I am proud to receive a letter from my sponsor because anytime I get a reply to my letter I feel important. I also like the stickers and coloring books, stickers to play with and coloring books to see things new for me.”

Through sponsorship programs, she also enjoys going to Reading Camp, where students come together for group lessons with a teacher from the community outside of their regular classes at school. Through sponsorship, teachers receive books to support storytelling and literacy building skills with their students in the Reading Camp, as well as are trained by sponsorship experts on how to use child-centered and child-friendly interactive teaching styles that keep children engaged and excited to learn.

In her free time, Nana Rouwaida also likes helping her mother around the house, for example grinding millet for their meals, sweeping or making the fire for cooking. With her friends she enjoys playing their favorite game, called chalele, involving dancing, clapping and singing traditional songs, generally played by girls. She is also very fond of goats and takes care of them to help her father.

She says what she cherishes most is the time spent on Wednesday afternoons and Saturdays, when she goes to the fields to collect grass for the goats. “I like goats because they are easy to breed,” she shares with pride.

Nana Rouwaida shares her dream for the future.
Nana Rouwaida shares her dream for the future.

Nana Rouwaida is supported in her dream of becoming a nurse by her father, Illa, who also shares the same vision as his daughter. Despite being sixty years old, he is among the few parents from their village who strongly supports young girls’ education, rather than expecting them to only help care for the family. “I understand that education is the key to development and I want my daughter Nana Rouwaida to become a nurse one day, in order to help herself and help other people around her.”

Nana Rouwaida’s teacher, Harouna Siradji, shares that the sponsorship program has already made a positive change in Nana Rouwaida’s life, after running programs for just one year in Tchadoua. “She is now very active in class, [and] her handwriting improves thanks to the Reading Camp.”

For the children in Tchadoua, there is a long way to go. However, things are already beginning to change, and Nana Rouwaida knows that with her sponsor Helen by her side, nothing can stop her.

Interested in joining our community of sponsors? Click here to learn more.

Lucas Becomes a Leader

Author Portrait_Ruth Carola Zambrana Valencia, Sponsorship Assistant
Ruth Carola Zambrana Valencia

Sponsorship Assistant

Save the Children in Bolivia

September 7, 2017

Children in Bolivia discover leadership in many ways. Some children may recognize their leadership skills during a school presentation, others may realize this on the playground or practicing sports. Unfortunately, for many children in Cochabamba, where sponsorship works, there aren’t many spaces dedicated to strengthen and nurture these skills amongst children.

This was Lucas’s case – a lively and bright 10-year-old boy whose leadership talents probably would not have been encouraged and developed if it were not for sponsorship support in his community. Fortunately Lucas now is part of Save the Children’s Advisory Council.

“Being able to work with Save the Children is something extraordinary,” says Lucas.

10-year-old Lucas, Advisory Council member and student leader.
10-year-old Lucas, Advisory Council member and student leader.

The Advisory Council is a group composed of children and adolescents that represent the nearly 50 schools sponsorship works with in Cochabamba, Bolivia. It has been set up to promote the participation of children in sponsorship programs so that they are not only beneficiaries, but also decision makers within and about the programs sponsorship helps to run in their schools and community. Their participation on the Advisory Council allows these children to have the opportunity to express their views and influence decision making. The council is an open and active participation space for children, where they are encouraged to share their opinions, reflect on different issues that affect children and most importantly, are listened to. The members of this Advisory Council are also part of the Children and Adolescent Municipal Council of Cochabamba, a group affiliated with local government. This an important space that allows them to influence public policies.

Lucas was a child selected by his peers for the council because he always is watching over the needs of others. Despite these social skills, Lucas’s mom also recalls that before joining this group, he “was not interested in anything and didn’t like to participate.”

Lucas acknowledges that he used to be a restless boy, which he attributes to his energies not being channeled towards anything specific. Thanks to being part of the Advisory Council he began to see changes in his own life and in his self-esteem. Council members benefit not only in improving their communication skills at council meetings, but also can participate in workshops and conferences that strengthen their leadership and life skills. For example, the Advisory Council members organized and participated in the “For Our Rights” conference, held last year to celebrate the 27th anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child – an international human rights treaty stating the rights of children.

“Now I am more educated… in school there were many changes. My schoolmates used to bother me a lot, [but] now that I entered the Advisory Council, they come to ask me for help, they tell me: Lucas, I need this. Will you help me?” he shares proudly.

Lucas speaking to local media at the anniversary celebration for the Convention on the Rights of the Child.
Lucas speaking to local media at the anniversary celebration for the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

His mother, Paola Daisy, also noticed changes in her son’s life, and says that, “Little by little he has been integrating himself and being more talkative. He is interested in things that happen, he is motivated to do things and to achieve his ideas. He wasn’t like this, before there wasn’t any motivation, now he has more initiative, is more interested in knowing what is happening in school and around him.”

Both Lucas and his family are very grateful for the support provided to his school through Save the Children and the Advisory Council, which strengthened his leadership skills and his ambition to achieve his future life goals.

All the way from Cochabamba – thank you, dear sponsors!

Interested in joining our community of sponsors? Click here to learn more.

 

Finding a Way Back to School

Author Portrait_Aminata Diarra, Community Development Agent of Kapala Community in Sikasso
Aminata Diarra

Community Development Agent of Kapala Community in Sikasso

Save the Children in Mali

September 5, 2017

Oumar is an 11-year-old boy and the oldest child of his parents. He is attending the 6th grade and was enrolled in sponsorship programs in 2011, as soon as he was old enough to attend school, although Oumar’s village of Sanasso has been receiving sponsorship support for nearly a decade.

Because of the closely spaced pregnancies of his siblings, Oumar’s mother was struggling to care for her growing family. To help support his parents and sisters, Oumar moved in with his grandparents. His elderly grandparents didn’t have sufficient resources to pay for the monthly school fees needed to send Oumar to school. Without paying, he was expelled. He was not the only child in his village who faced this issue, as the community lacked a good support system to help those in similar situations.

Thanks to sponsorship, today 11-year-old Oumar is back at school.
Thanks to sponsorship, today 11-year-old Oumar is back at school.

To help bring more children back into school, sponsorship started livelihood programs in Oumar’s village. Activities that generate income for family members were promptly started in the community. The program aims to support households in obtaining resources which can improve their living conditions. For Oumar’s village, a cereal bank and a sheep breeding program were set-up. The cereal bank benefits the community members by helping them purchase and stock grains during times of the year when prices are low, so that they can resell them when prices go back up. The cattle breeding program, on the other hand, provides school management committees and select families rams and sheep to breed, the offspring from which can then be sold to help pay for school expenses. Community members not only benefit from the profit, but from the skills learned in both these trades.

With the profits from these programs, more parents, including Oumar’s who participated in both, are able to send their children to school. The community has been so successful in these ventures that they’ve even been able to pay teachers more, who before were making very little pay.

Oumar playing with his friends in the school yard, happy to be attending classes again.
Oumar playing with his friends in the school yard, happy to be attending classes again.

Oumar’s grandfather Seydou is a member of the school management committee, a group of community members that is responsible for all activities of the school including the management of school fees and expenses, and helps run the livelihoods programs. He shared, “Thanks to Save the Children, our community is well organized and united.”

Hady, his other grandfather, also commented, “Thanks to Save the Children, my grandson, Oumar is happy to get back to school. In addition to that, our community has benefited from the building of 3 classrooms, so I am very proud of that.”

These activities have successfully reduced the drop-out rates in this part of Mali, thanks to the support of sponsors. So far, no children have had to drop out this year – this would not have been possible without the kind and open hearts of our donors.

Interested in joining our community of sponsors? Click here to learn more.

Aida Becomes a Leader

Author Portrait_Walaa Hassan, Adolescents and Livelihoods Program Officer
Walaa Hassan

Adolescents and Livelihoods Program Officer

Save the Children in Egypt

September 2, 2017

On her way to her first day of facilitators’ training, 16-year-old Aida smiled as she passed by the Arab Al-Qadadeh youth center, remembering how before she was not allowed to enter this place to play or even to attend any kinds of activities.

In rural areas especially in Upper Egypt, where Aida is from, people are conservative and trust in old traditions that restrict the movement of girls, frowning on their involvement in outdoor activities or other events that would have them move around or play in front of boys or in the public’s eye. Instead, they are expected to spend all their time doing work around their homes or finding other ways to serve family members, for example by doing farm work to help with income.

Aida, youth leader and champion of girls' rights.
Aida, youth leader and champion of girls’ rights.

Aida joined Tomohaty in 2015. Tomohaty, meaning “Ambitions” in English, is a holistic program that covers topics that are related to the wellbeing of adolescents, such as life skills, responsible citizenship, reproductive health, livelihoods and career guidance. This curriculum is provided through coordination between Save the Children sponsorship staff and the local Ministry of Youth, and supported thanks to donations from our sponsors. It focuses on empowering out-of-school girls through sessions that build their self-confidence and teach them how to express their opinions, adopt positive behaviors and attitudes, and make decisions. In addition to learning new skills, the Tomohaty program also sets up time for girls-only sports activities inside the local youth center. This is so important to combat the culture that keeps girls inside their homes, both by helping girls to feel free and also by calming parents’ fears as they know the girls are playing somewhere safe.

Previously, Aida used to spend her time doing the housework or working in the fields to earn money. She would hand the money to her father to help provide for the family, so that he would not have to carry this burden all by himself. She was deprived from her right to learn and not allowed to go to school. Instead she was exposed to the very strenuous and high pressure responsibility of supporting the family, which deeply affected her hopes for the future.

By joining Tomohaty, Aida started to attend sessions with girls her age and practice sports at the youth center, exploring her self-awareness as she had never done before. She discovered, for example, that she is very talented in volleyball. She also started to share what she learned in the adolescent sessions with her parents and siblings.

She began to shift her role from solely attending the sessions to more of a leadership role, for example helping to keep the other students organized by assigning roles in activities and group projects, speaking out in front of the group, and taking the initiative to talk to the head of the youth center about the girls’ needs. Through these sessions, Tomohaty taught her how to express her fear and rejection of the traditions restrictive of her rights to her parents and help them understand the freedom and opportunities she felt she deserved.

Despite their conservative traditions, her family began to support her, even when her network in the community became wider as she started to tell her neighbors about the importance of these sessions for their daughters. Although she is young, she was able to make a significant impact on her community, evidenced when 8 new girls from her neighborhood in Arab Al-Qadadeh joined Tomohaty classes, solely resulting from Aida’s conversations with them and their parents.

Aida showing her classmates the right positions before their volleyball match.
Aida showing her classmates the right positions before their volleyball match.

In addition to that, the Tomohaty program helped Aida to attend a training for social workers and facilitators on first aid, which she was able to use to help her father when he burned his hands while making tea at home. He was astonished with her knowledge but more so with her new found self-confidence. “Now I am proud of having a daughter supporting me like a boy, [even] more [than a boy],” said Aida’s father excitedly. He was even more proud when she practiced with him the lessons on first aid and ways to deal with emergencies which she would be demonstrating to new girls in the youth center.

Aida was nominated to be a facilitator in 2017 after displaying her leadership skills and talent in communicating with girls.  “Aida has transformed into a young lady in her attitudes and behaviors, she has formed effective relationships with girls in the youth center and she has turned into a leader,” explained her Tomohaty facilitator, Faiza, a sponsorship trained community member who helps oversee the group.

Aida also attended a 7-day training with Save the Children to even further enhance her skills in facilitation and communication, and she is now preparing her first session as a Tomohaty facilitator in the Arab Al-Qadadeh youth center.

“I want to add value for other girls in their lives. I want to be a female leader and make my parents proud of me even more,” recounted Aida with confidence. Clearly, Aida is already achieving these dreams and helping many people.

Our deepest thanks to our sponsors of the children and programs in Egypt for making these achievements possible.

Interested in joining our community of sponsors? Click here to learn more.

Giveness’s Last 6 Hour Walk

Author Portrait_Annette Malilo, Information and Communication Officer
Annette Malilo

Information and Communication Officer

Save the Children in Zambia

August 18, 2017

Life has not been easy for 13-year-old Giveness, a grade 6 student in Lufwanyama, Zambia. She lives in a small village called Chifumpa with her mother, father and younger sister, 9-year-old Bibiana. Villagers here earn their living by fishing and farming. Giveness makes sure she helps her mother with washing dishes and fetching firewood, which are common daily chores for children in this rural part of the world.

Giveness with her bicycle, which cuts her 3-hour ride to school to just 1 hour!
Giveness with her bicycle, which cuts her 3-hour ride to school to just 1 hour!

Determined to be a nurse when she grows older, she goes to school every day with her sister. In the past, they would walk side-by-side for three hours each way to school through the thick forests that surround their village, spending an unbearable six hours walking each day. Because of this, children like Giveness and her sister were frequently absent and had to repeat grades due to poor school performance. For some, rivers and lakes further impede travel, when during the rainy season floods make some areas completely impassable for the unsupervised children on their daily journey.

“Before Save the Children gave us bicycles I used to walk 15 kilometers to school and back every day. I would start off at 5am when it’s still dark with my young sister. We would walk for 3 hours and our legs would be sore. We almost gave up on school. But now that I have a bicycle my legs feel better.” she shyly says in the local language, called Lamba.

Giveness is now able to go to school every day and carry her sister along with her on her bicycle, like many of her friends that have also received a bicycle thanks to sponsorship funding support, purchased through a community cash transfer program. The head teacher also shared that the number of children attending school has risen as those that have received bicycles carry their friends and siblings along as they go to school.

Giveness smiling with her friends outside of their sponsorship supported school.
Giveness smiling with her friends outside of their sponsorship supported school.

“I am so happy to be sponsored because I am able to learn, receive letters from my sponsor, and also have a bicycle. When I grow up I want to be a nurse because I am acquiring a lot of knowledge at school.” Giveness says proudly.

Giveness now cycles to school within an hour and another hour to get back home. Instead of taking a journey of six hours, it now takes her just two, and she does not miss out on any lessons because she is always on time and no longer constantly tired and sore. Thank you, sponsors, for making this possible!

Interested in joining our community of sponsors? Click here to learn more.

My Sponsor’s Name is Kim

Author Portrait_Maria Rosario Garcia, Sponsorship Communications Coordinator
Maria Rosario Garcia

Sponsorship Communications Coordinator

Save the Children Philippines

August 8, 2017

“My sponsor’s name is Kim,” 6-year-old Maria proudly told me as I spoke to her one day after class. I was visiting her community in South Central Mindanao to deliver the newest letter she had received from her sponsor. She spoke confidently and proudly, and sounded like she knew her sponsor very well.

Maria and her family live in an area where most families do not have the ability to provide three meals a day, have clean drinking water or even a single toy for their children to play with. Her father works as a driver, who is able to come home only on the weekends, while her mother stays at home to take care of Maria and her 9-year-old brother, Zyrich.

Maria smiling in front of her classroom.
Maria smiling in front of her classroom.

Having a sponsor keeps Maria excited about her days. She is eager to share with Kim about her life and about what she is learning in school. People from Maria’s hometown have little mobility to move beyond the community – it is a small and remote village where usually people only travel as far as where they can reach on foot. Her eyes light up with wonder when she reads the letter describing what it is like in the country where her sponsor lives, in the state of Texas in the United States. Hearing stories about the different places in her sponsor’s life has made her realize that the world is bigger than she ever imagined it to be.

She knows there is so much beyond her community now and she awaits for stories about that world in the letters she receives – learning about Kim’s family, her pets and the places she has visited. Maria clearly remembers that she received three letters from her sponsor, each equally exciting and wonderful, over the little over a year she’s been sponsored by Kim. “It makes me happy to know that I have a picture in their house,” she shared smiling, describing the photo all sponsors receive from their sponsored children each year. Maria’s facial expression was more than happy as she continued to tell me that she felt like she’s part of Kim’s family, and that she feels cared for even though they are countries and oceans apart.

After two years of attending our learning programs, Maria is now happily attending her first grade in primary school. These sponsorship supported programs have provided Maria and the other children in her community with reading camps to practice their reading skills with peers, the provision of new learning materials and book banks from which books can now be borrowed, and additional supplies for their schools that enhance literacy and numeracy skills.

Maria now knows how to wash her hands properly, thanks to sponsorship health programs in her school.
Maria now knows how to wash her hands properly, thanks to sponsorship health programs in her school.

Today, Maria says she wants to be a teacher so she can teach more children how to read, write and color pictures as she is so fond of doing! She tells me she cannot wait to share this dream with Kim.

If I were able to meet Maria’s sponsor, I would tell her that she has all the reasons to be proud of Maria. Aside from her astounding progress in school, she is also one of the Child Ambassadors who represents her community in Save the Children’s programs – serving as an embodiment of the achievements her community has been able to implement with sponsorship support.

Sponsorship shares and inspires not just future teachers like Maria, but future doctors, police officers, pilots, veterinarians and more in the over 20 countries where we implement our programs. If you haven’t written to your sponsored child yet, we encourage you to do so! Our experience tells us that letter writing is extremely rewarding for sponsors and children alike – you may help to shape their future dreams!

Interested in joining our community of sponsors? Click here to learn more.

Gelane Goes Back to School

Author Portrait_Temesgen Afeta, Community Mobilization & Communications Coordinator
Temesgen Afeta

Community Mobilization & Communications Coordinator

Save the Children in Ethiopia

August 4, 2017

In the remote and rural West Showa district of Ethiopia, not all parents have equal understanding of the importance in sending their children to school, and how this helps them become productive adults and succeed in life. Some may not even think about helping their children in their education, as most lack the awareness on how significant a quality education can be for shaping their children’s futures.

12-year-old Gelane lives in a community where Save the Children sponsorship funded programs started in 2011. Initially, there had been no school in her village, and parents had been sending their children far away to get to school, or kept them at home altogether. In order to reach the closest school, children would need to travel an average of 3 hours a day on foot. Often, only the stronger, older children would be able to make the journey, however many older children are also pulled out of school to help support their families. Additionally, the teachers that were available were untrained and used traditional, rote memorization teaching methods that do not create a supportive learning environment for children. All this combined to keep attendance rates very low and, for what children did attend, learning was difficult and not interactive or fun.

Thanks to support from our sponsors, Save the Children was able to build a brand new school, train the teachers, provide learning materials and speak to parents about the importance of sending their children to school. Since then, all the children in the community have been going to school. Currently, the nearly 200 children from preschool to grade 4 who are now attending the new school would have found it nearly impossible to reach a school before. Through sponsorship across West Showa, new classrooms have been built in almost 50 different schools, supporting more than 30,000 children in accessing a quality education.

12-year-old Gelane is happy and proud to finally be back in school.
12-year-old Gelane is happy and proud to finally be back in school.

Gelane, though she went to the old school, had struggled in completing grades or attending consistently due to the distance and lack of engaging lessons once she got there. She dropped out in grade 3, already falling behind other students at just 9 years old. Her parents needed her support to handle extra chores around the home, while her older siblings were allowed to continue learning instead. Gelane was out of school and at home for an almost unbearably long two years.

Despite construction of the new school, dialogue amongst community members was still needed to sensitize parents and caregivers about the importance of an education. As a result of these efforts, sponsorship staff finally convinced Gelane’s parents that she should return to school.

With Gelane’s dream of returning to school realized, she has been able to continue her learning in the same grade from when she had been forced to drop out. Today, she is enjoying school with both old and new friends, and participating in sponsorship’s literacy, numeracy and school health and nutrition programs at school. She found the school environment she returned to was full of new storybooks and lively and fun lessons for her to participate in. For example, through the newly established Girls’ Club, she is gaining important knowledge about how to keep her body safe and healthy as she becomes a woman – something she couldn’t get a word on from either of her parents at home as the topic is considered taboo. Additionally, at the newly established community learning center in her village, also set-up thanks to sponsors, she is able to practice her reading skills outside of school or on the weekends by using or borrowing the reading materials now available there.

Gelane studying with some classmates from her sponsorship supported school.
Gelane studying with some classmates from her sponsorship supported school.

Today, Gelane dreams of completing all the grades in school, like her peers. She hopes that the support she is getting both in school and at the community learning center will help make this dream a reality.

Gelane’s teacher, Shure, shared, “There are many children like Gelane, in the communities, who are born with a lot of potential but unlucky in getting a chance to make their dreams successful… Save the Children is supporting on this through community mobilization, and go-to-school and back-to school-campaigns. Many children are getting back to school as a result. We hope the situation will improve.”

Little by little, things are changing in Ethiopia, and the children and families there have sponsors to thank for that. Thank you for your support to brighten the future for children in West Showa!

Interested in joining our community of sponsors? Click here to learn more.

Nahomie Empowers Other Girls

Author Potrait_Yamileh Théodore, Sponsorship Operations Coordinator
Edited by Yamileh Théodore

Sponsorship Operations Coordinator

Save the Children in Haiti

July 31, 2017

Hello, I am Nahomie and I am fourteen years old. I live with my parents and my three siblings in a community named Villard in Dessalines, Haiti. As the eldest, I usually help my siblings with their homework and my mother with the household chores such as washing clothes and dishes. My favorite subject is Math. Also, I enjoy playing hide and seek, hopscotch and jump rope with my friends and schoolmates.

As a typical teenager, I have a group of friends and we do everything together. For example, we like to wear the same kinds of clothes, and when one friend had her first boyfriend, we all wanted boyfriends.  Following the group, I had my first boyfriend last year.

Thanks to sponsorship, Nahomie has learned how to keep herself safe as she grows into a woman.
Thanks to sponsorship, Nahomie has learned how to keep herself safe as she grows into a woman.

In my community in Haiti, parents aren’t comfortable talking with us about sex – it is a taboo subject to discuss with people my age, regardless of if we are boys or girls. I had a lot of questions about having a boyfriend, and I didn’t know where to go.

Thanks to Save the Children’s program set-up for teens like me, I was able to seek out a friendly environment to ask questions about sex, my changing body and becoming an adult. Through sponsorship’s adolescent development programs, our teachers, school principals, school councils, or Parent Teacher Associations, and community partners receive training on Sexual Education and child-friendly ways for adults to talk about sexual and reproductive health issues with students.

As a result of these programs, a health-care worker came to my school to talk about the services that were available at the health center in our community. After hearing them speak, I went to the health center to see how I could get involved and learn more. I started participating in a student club, that both helps spread health messages to people my age but also helps build my own leadership skills and self-confidence. I was able to not only find answers to the questions I wanted to ask, but was able to discuss these questions with both adults and peers in a place I felt safe.

Today, I feel comfortable speaking about my experiences as a growing girl in my community, and using my voice to create awareness among the others about how sexual intercourse at such young age can be harmful for our lives and our futures. Waiting until a more mature age can help us avoid a lot of mistakes, such as an early pregnancy, that would affect us for the rest of our lives.

Nahomie washing the dishes outside of her home.
Nahomie washing the dishes outside of her home.

Whenever I want, I can seek more information about my sexual and reproductive health at the health center, where now I am always welcomed by staff who can offer even more information. I go there for myself, but also to create awareness and prevent adolescents like me from feeling influenced by pressures from their friends, and instead to make the best decision for their own well-being.

I am proud and thankful to Save the Children, this is a very good program! After meeting with the healthcare workers, I am now inspired to grow up to be like them. I work even harder at school so I can finish my studies in order to become a nurse. I will continue with the work they started in my community and help other adolescents who are in need. This is the dream I am now cherishing.

Interested in joining our community of sponsors? Click here to learn more.

Now I Can Read the Books by Myself

Author Portrait_Fahim Shahriar, Deputy Manager - Sponsorship Communication and Data QualityFahim Shahriar

Deputy Manager, Sponsorship Communication and Data Quality

Save the Children in Bangladesh

July 21, 2017

Sajib is now over 7 years old, and lives with his family in the slums of Rayerbazar, an area with run-down, overcrowded and unsafe informal housing, in Dhaka North City, one of the areas in which sponsorship works in Bangladesh. His father Fazlu pulls rickshaws in order to support their family, and his mother Ajufa works supporting the home. He is the youngest among 4 siblings, and has been involved in Save the Children’s sponsorship program since May of 2016.

Before sponsorship came to Dhaka North City, children had very few opportunities to learn or play outside of school. They could be seen usually aimlessly wandering the meandering slum city paths and streets. No one had talked to their parents about how important receiving an education could be for their children, and so parents would not involve themselves in supporting their children’s schooling. Sajib and other children from the slums had irregular attendance and didn’t enjoy reading, because they found it so difficult and because there were so few books available to them. As a 1st grader, Sajib had trouble recognizing the letters of the alphabet, and could not read any books on his own.

Sajib and his parents came to know about sponsorship by attending a gathering hosted by Save the Children for parents in their community. After that, they began to understand the impact sponsorship, and having a strong foundational education, could have on their son’s future.

Sajib reading a storybook with friends Firoza and Rabibul at the center.
Sajib reading a storybook with friends Firoza and Rabibul at the center.

Thanks to these programs, Sajib’s learning abilities have been transformed. He now has the great joy of attending after-school programming at the sponsorship supported community center in his neighborhood. There he is greeted by a child-friendly learning environment, with walls covered in colorful posters and images, and shelves full of print-rich materials.

He shares proudly, “Now, I am reading in grade two at school. After school, I love going to Shishu Mela [local sponsorship supported community center], because my many friends go there. We read storybooks and play games together there.”

At sponsorship programs Sajib was also introduced to a child-centered teaching style for the first time, which employs interactive and fun learning techniques to keep him engaged in the daily lessons. “Apa reads the books to us in special way, I like that and for this reason, I go to the center,” he shares about the way the center facilitator, Apa, reads books to them in an entertaining way that captures their imaginations – storytelling with rhythm and pace, pausing at the exciting parts and speaking with feeling to convey the characters’ emotions.

“I participate in storytelling sessions and I have learned spellings of words,” he continues proudly, “Now, I enjoy reading stories and sometimes I borrow books from the center to read at home. Because of this center, now I can read the books by myself.”

Adding to his new found reading skills, Sajib and his family are very happy to get connected with their new friend abroad who is contributing to the wellbeing of their community in so many ways. “I am feeling so special after knowing that I have got a new friend in abroad, because not all other children here in my community have such a friend,” shares Sajib, describing the newly formed friendship with his sponsor, Casey, who started sponsoring him in December of 2016.

Sajib preparing a drawing for his sponsor, Casey.
Sajib preparing a drawing for his sponsor, Casey.

With the encouragement in letters from his sponsor and the enjoyment and new found confidence he has from learning at the community center, Sajib is flourishing. He attends school regularly now and reads on his own time outside of school.

His mother Ajufa shared, “I am so happy to know that my son Sajib is chosen by someone from abroad for friendship. I have learned the importance of such a friendship by seeing his progress after attending sessions at the community center. He can read stories by himself and his reading habit has increased too. He is teaching us handwashing and hygiene practices that he is learning at the center. These changes are happening to him because of [the] sponsorship contribution of foreign friends [sponsors]. Like my son, many other children of our community are also benefitting through sponsorship support. I want this relationship with his friend to continue!”

We know that receiving letters from sponsors makes a huge impact on sponsored children, giving them a sense of pride and self-worth. Sajib concludes, “I am very much excited as I could have written about myself and drawn a picture for my friend, which is the first time for me. I have loved writing and drawing a lot as those are shared with my friend through Save the Children. Now, I am waiting to hear from my friend and very eager to know more about him.”

Interested in joining our community of sponsors? Click here to learn more.

Steven Gets Motivated

Author Portrait_Steven, Sponsored Child
Naicee Martin

Program Specialist

Save the Children U.S. Programs

July 13, 2017

Steven is 9 years old and participates in our sponsorship and afterschool programs in California. Steven loves being outside and is learning to play football and soccer. He also likes going to the library and learning about different animals. Steven enjoys corresponding with his sponsor and has fun composing letters. He said that on days when he is feeling sad the letters make him smile. Steven’s older sister passed away last year so this has been an important source of support for him. He likes to learn about different places and was curious about his sponsor’s life.

9-year-old Steven participates in sponsorship and afterschool programs in California.
9-year-old Steven participates in sponsorship and afterschool programs in California.

Steven began participating in the program 2 years ago when he was struggling with reading and homework. In the past year, Steven has made great improvements in his reading skills and now enjoys reading. His self-confidence has also improved. The encouragement and support he received from Save the Children programs helped him to keep moving forward while coping with the loss of his sister.

Steven loves being outside and is learning to play football and soccer.
Steven loves being outside and is learning to play football and soccer.

Steven’s teacher shared that she has noticed that Steven is interacting more in the classroom and is able to understand more than he did at the beginning of the year. He has built strong friendships in the afterschool program that motivate him in the classroom. Steven’s other sister shared, “His self-esteem has gotten so much better. Being in the program and getting to try new things, reading new books and playing new games really makes him happy.” The sponsorship and afterschool programs have supported Steven in strengthening his reading skills and self-confidence while providing support as he dealt with a traumatic event in his life.

Interested in joining our community of sponsors? Click here to learn more.