Gerald Gets Healthy

By Sam Labu

Community Sponsorship Officer

Save the Children in Uganda

September 14, 2018

Gerald is a 10-year-old boy from Kakiri sub-county in the Wakiso District of Uganda. He is in 3rd grade and is an active member of his school health club, which was set up through the sponsorship program in his community. The goal of this club is to provide an avenue for children to learn and participate in improving their personal health and hygiene.

In Uganda, school pupils face a number of challenges related to poor hygiene and sanitation. Before Save the Children started working in Gerald’s community, children did not have access to safe drinking water at school.

Drinking contaminated water from the nearby wells and harvested rainwater was the order of the day for pupils. This caused many diseases like diarrhea, dysentery, and typhoid which caused students to miss school a lot. “I used to miss school because of diarrhea and stomach aches, I didn’t know that it was because of the water we were drinking at school,” says Gerald.

Through Save the Children’s Healthy Girls and Boys program, our goal is to improve the health and education status of children to enable them to learn and develop to their full potential. School health clubs were set-up in every school reached by sponsorship to empower the pupils with the knowledge to keep themselves healthy. In Uganda, we’ve reached over 80 schools with this type of health education program, including mentoring and training for nearly 3,000 girls and boys.

The pupils and their teachers as well were educated on the dangers of drinking unsafe water. Along with that, access to safe drinking water was provided to the schools. For example, sponsorship provided SODIS devices, which stands for solar disinfection of water, and safe water tanks to store boiled drinking water in. The teachers in each of the schools were also trained on how to incorporate health education into the classroom, for example teaching children how to use and maintain the new water tanks. Gerald’s school received spouts which use a ceramic water filter – a type of filter which purifies and disinfects water using a layer of silver nitrate.

Gerald, as a member of his school health club, has also learned how to guide the other students in where to access the clean water and encourages them to drink it, to keep themselves hydrated and avoid needing to drink from the dirty water sources. “I always remind my classmates to drink the safe water from the spout because it will help them not fall sick and miss school.” says Gerald. He and his fellow club members are also responsible for keeping their school compound and classrooms clean and orderly, as well as maintaining handwashing facilities at school and assisting the younger students in washing their hands.

With access to safe drinking water in the schools, the pupils no longer miss school because of diseases like diarrhea, dysentery, and typhoid. They are healthier and more eager to learn.

“Thanks to Save the Children, I am healthy, I go to school every day and I am working hard to be a lawyer in the future.” Gerald said with a hopeful grin.

With support from Save the Children through the school health clubs, Gerald and other pupils know the dangers of drinking unsafe water and are empowered to be great advocates for better sanitation and hygiene practices in the community.

Interested in joining our community of sponsors? Click here to learn more.

When You Meet Your Other Family


By Agus, Edited by Suciati Bobu

Sponsorship Operations Staff

Save the Children in Indonesia

September 6, 2018

On February 13th, 2017, I was spending time with my friends playing around our home, when my teacher came to visit. As I approached wondering what news the teacher had brought in to my parents, I was called, “Agus, please come in! I’ve got something to tell you!” The teacher waved me to come closer, “You know what, you are going to have your sponsor visit you soon,” she told me. “Your parents are okay with the visit. What do you think?”

I thought, “Wow, there is a foreigner coming to visit me! Is it true? Is there someone who wants to come a long way to visit me in my village?”

I live in a small farming village in the mountains on an island, where it is very rare to receive visits from outsiders, even from the little town here. Expecting a foreigner to visit me was beyond my imagination. As a school ambassador of Save the Children, I have a sponsor in Korea whose name is Mr. Choi. We write to each other through letters. Is this Korean man sure he would like to come to see me? Questions boomed in my head.

Agus writing a letter to his sponsor, Mr. Choi.

“Yes!” I gave my short answer with a big nod. It was a ‘yes’ with a mix of wonder, many questions and of course, excitement.

Time flew by and it came the day of the visit, the 5th of May, 2017. My parents came along to school to meet Mr. Choi and his family. I was excited about meeting them. “What will they look like?” I saw a group of people stepping out of the car. I could see four beautiful people who looked different from the others. They were Mr. Choi, his wife, and their son and daughter – Wonho who was 5 and little Yunji who was just 3. The other two were Save the Children staff who helped facilitate the meeting. “They are here, it’s unbelievable!” I thought to myself.

When it came to the introduction part, I was so nervous. I did not know what to say to Mr. Choi and his family. I had no clue how to speak Korean, even English. Luckily, the people from Save the Children helped me. It was surprising to know that Mr. Choi still remembered my dream of becoming a pilot. I recalled that I once mentioned it when I wrote a letter to him. He knew and remembered that about me, and much more through the letters I sent. He told me how keen they were to visit me. I felt so special.

Agus’s family and Mr. Choi’s family meet up at school.

We then walked together to see the other students. As Mr. Choi is a dentist, he brought hundreds of toothbrushes. We shared them with the other students at school. In class, we learn about how to have good personal hygiene and nutrition, and learn about how and when to brush our teeth, too. Just like Mr. Choi does at his job!

Before leaving, Mr. Choi came to me and said, “I’ll try to come back. Please study hard to reach your dream. Go to school every day and obey your parents!” It was just a few of hours meeting, but seeing them leaving was heart breaking. Yet, I know that we would still communicate through letters. Most of all, I am now confident in studying even harder in order to pursue my dream.

I know that I have my other family in another part of the world who always supports me.

Have you written to your sponsored child lately? A quick note with a few words of encouragement can make a world of difference for a struggling child. Consider sharing a message with them today!

Interested in joining our community of sponsors? Click here to learn more.

 

Celebrating the African Child


Annette Malilo Konsolo

Information and Communications Officer

Save the Children in Zambia

August 27, 2018

The atmosphere at one of our local primary schools was special this day, as it was hosting an important day in the lives of many children. With the Zambian flag flying high, teachers struggled to keep children together as there was so much to see. Younger students could be seen peeping through the classroom windows, trying to catch a glimpse of the older boys moving around outside the school, carrying drums over their shoulders while the girls set-up decorations in the school hall. They just couldn’t wait to dance to the rhythm of those big drums.

International Day of the African Child has been celebrated on June 16th every year since 1991, after it was initiated by the OAU, the Organization of African Unity. It honors those who participated in the Soweto Uprising on that day in 1976. In the Soweto Uprising, black South African students led protests against the discriminatory policies of the Apartheid government. The event is historically significant for the extreme police brutality the students faced, and its role in bringing international attention to the cruel realities faced by black South Africans. The Day of the African Child brings with it an important aspect in the lives of African children and those of different nationalities across the world alike.

Sara with her best friend Rose during Day of the African child celebrations.

Charity, the headteacher at the school, together with other members of her school staff, took their places as everyone joined them for the national anthem. Afterwards, Charity and Save the Children staff spoke to the crowd on the day’s activities. The atmosphere was filled with pride, as Zambia has enjoyed 52 years of peace. Looking around the crowd, one could also see the pride that came along with being an African child, as children eagerly listened in.

Standing beside her mother, 8-year-old Sara struggled to sing the anthem to perfection but still understood the meaning of the song and the words to it. Probably one day when she’s a bit older, its words will mean even more to her.

“She’s so anxious to learn new things and never stops asking me questions. Being a Caregiver myself, I have no problem as I teach younger children so I understand her,” says Sara’s mother, Phales, who is in her mid-twenties. As a Save the Children Caregiver, Phales teaches in the Early Learners center in their community, working with children ages 3 – 8 in developing their learning skills in sponsorship supported programs. She also assists sponsorship operations, for example, helping children reply to sponsor letters.

Sara dancing with her classmate Reuben during Day of the African Child celebrations.

A spectacular show filled with drumming, dancing, and educational poems had even the children in the back rows of the hall on their feet, as they struggled to see what was happening ahead. Poems were also shared by children on topics related to child protection, equal opportunities, and child empowerment. Luckily for Sara and her mother, together with some of the other younger children, they were given seats right in the front row.  

With organizations like Save the Children giving a second chance to the lives of many children through bigger and brighter education opportunities, every last African child can shine and contribute positively to their society.

Interested in joining our community of sponsors? Click here to learn more.

Working with Communities


Zewge Abate

Internal Communications Manager

Save the Children in Ethiopia

August 20, 2018

My first fieldwork with Save the Children took me to the area of Central Tigray, where I was also able to visit Axum, a town I always wanted to see. In Axum, I wanted to make a connection with our great past through the city’s remnants of ancient civilizations and rich heritage.

Standing in the background of the great obelisks, I felt like my world was dwarfed by the wisdom and tall spirits of my ancestors. Touching the stones that have long fended the ancient St. Mary’s Church left me with a great sense of perseverance and vigilance. A little weary of the deafening urban noise and congestion in Addis Ababa, I thought it was also refreshing to experience people’s sense of calm and the town’s modest vibe. From the shuttle driver who took me to my hotel, to the young jewelry vendors who left me smiling when I told them I was not a buyer, to the waiters who took my orders for dinner – the local people looked politely proud or proudly polite. I could not for sure tell which.

Children attending class under makeshift structures and using stones and logs as seats.

I was part of the Save the Children team attending a launching event for the sponsorship program in Central Tigray. I learned this program is designed to last ten years, in order to reach some 200,000 early learning and primary school students in about 200 schools across Central Tigray. These efforts would reach students ages 4 to 14, working to improve quality of classrooms and learning materials, teaching skills of teachers, involvement of parents in children’s educations, and much more.

In the first three years alone, we plan to reach 52,000 students in 63 schools.

From what I saw during my visit, there was a long way to go. Class was held in semi-permanent structures, with little protection from the elements save a shade above the children’s heads to keep them out of the sun. Children sat on stones or logs, which caused discomfort as the day went on and made it difficult for them to concentrate. The walls were practically empty, with no colorful, engaging or print rich materials to see. There were no books or toys, and almost no learning materials to be seen either, except a small blackboard – overall it was not a child-friendly space.

Despite the harsh environment, children are eager to learn.

Although I’ve only been a part of the sponsorship team for a few months, I’ve already been able to witness the high level of determination the communities have to work with Save the Children. Local families feel ownership in these interventions because we involve them every step of the way, in all decisions. Their trust in Save the Children is clear. With organizational support from sponsorship staff, the community members had raised their own money, despite meagre resources, in order to help support construction of the new classrooms.

Now, the community at large and the Parent Teacher Association (PTA) are working together with Save the Children to monitor the construction of the new classrooms. The classrooms are nearly complete and the school benches and other learning materials are being purchased. The timing cannot be more perfect as the Ethiopian academic year is starting soon. When school opens, these classrooms will mean the world to the children here.

Interested in joining our community of sponsors? Click here to learn more.

Mario, Community Developer


Mario Nah Pool

Community Promoter

Save the Children Mexico

August 13, 2018

Hola! My name is Mario, I am 30 years old and I am a Community Developer in Yucatan – a state in the southern part of Mexico. We are close to an archaeological area that highlights the cultural wealth and indigenous history of this area of the country. At the moment, I live with my parents and brothers, who always have supported me in the different projects and goals I’ve aspired to.

Since I started to work at Save the Children in June of 2017, when sponsorship first came to Yucatan, knowing my work benefits children from Mayan communities has been my greatest satisfaction. They live in situations of exclusion and poverty and do not always have the tools to succeed.

Mario playing with children at a sponsorship-supported school.

At Save the Children we carry out different actions in schools and communities, not only working with children, but also with the parents, teachers and people in their community. As Community Developer, I promote activities and participation of children through games and art, and work closely with community members and schools to help create a plan for improving the quality of education offered here. The main problems we face are gender inequity and the lack of parent participation in their children’s education, which makes the children feel indifferent towards working hard at school.

One of the most rewarding experiences has been to help design and implement summer activities in the community of Temozón. There, children learned how to express themselves through art and painting, group reading activities, theater and games.

It was very exciting to be a part of something new, since it was the first time that a development or non-governmental organization had worked with children from that community. During the summer, children were mainly staying at home and did not have many activities, so being able to spend part of their day playing while learning was an amazing and wonderful thing.

Mario participating in summer sponsorship activities with the kids.

The summer camp had a very positive impact on children, from the first to the last day they were very excited to be there. It was so rewarding to see kids come to the summer sessions, riding their bikes with large smiles on their faces. Using different types of games, we led the children through themes like gender equality, children’s rights and the different professional options that exist in the country, which was a very interesting discovery for them, since they did not know most of them. Most adults here work in local trade, as farmers or fishermen. Despite the heat, the boys and girls did not stop singing and dancing with us. They certainly seemed to enjoy every moment!

Every day with Save the Children is an adventure. My contact with the community keeps me very enthusiastic to continue strengthening my commitment to social responsibility. I think of myself as an education endorser to foster children’s human rights, and improve their everyday life and conditions.

From me and the children here in Yucatan – we send our greatest thanks!

Interested in joining our community of sponsors? Click here to learn more.

Natene from Finkolo, Mali

Abdramane Maiga

Community Development Assistant

Save the Children in Mali

August 6, 2018

Natene is an 11-year-old girl living with her parents in the community of Finkolo, in the southeastern part of Mali. She is the youngest amongst her two siblings, and she now happily attends the 6th grade. She enjoys reading and participating in outdoor activities and sports, like racing her bicycle. Natene and her family have been participating in sponsorship programs since 2008.

Before Save the Children came to Finkolo, very young children, usually around ages 3 – 6, whose parents were busy doing daily activities in the fields were often left to fend for themselves during the day. They would take care of themselves, occupying their time, feeding themselves and generally keeping themselves safe. A lucky few were able to stay with the grandparents nearby.

In order to help these very young children, and their parents, Save the Children implements its Early Learners program. Knowing that the emotional, social and physical development of young children has a direct impact on their development as adults, Save Children has found it necessary to invest in the very young to maximize the future well-being of themselves, their families and their community. Natene enrolled in Early Learners when she was just 3 years old.

Natene in her school yard in Finkolo.

Through these programs, children can learn basic skills to help prepare them for primary school, for example, how to hold a piece of chalk, identify numbers, letters and colors, how to play well with others in groups and how to stay focused in class. Through activities like interactive games, songs, storytelling, social interaction and outdoor play, trained teachers help make sure children grow and thrive.

In these local early learning and development centers, children are supervised and monitored by trained instructors. The goal is to allow children to grow-up while learning in a child-friendly environment. At the early learning centers children can learn how to interact with each other in the classroom setting, and to learn through educational games organized by their instructors. Children also learn good behaviors, for example how to have good personal hygiene and when and how to wash ones hands properly.

Thanks to the education she received at the Early Learners center, by the time Natene enrolled in primary school 3 years later she could easily read and write, and overall seemed brighter. Children like Natene’s brothers and sisters, who did not have the chance to benefit from the Early Learners program, encounter great difficulties in doing the same exercise Natene now enjoys and completes with ease.

Natene practicing her reading skills in class.

Likewise, parents are able to focus on their daily tasks without fear, knowing their children are somewhere safe.

Issa and Michata, Natene’s parents, shared, “We understand the importance of education because of our daughter, Natene, who has benefited from Save the Children’s Early Learners program. Thanks to this program, she has been well protected and monitored. She was learning while playing with her peers. In the center, Natene learned the importance of handwashing and personal hygiene. She washes her hands before and after meals and after using latrine.”

Siaka, another student’s father, commented “In our community, education plays an important role. Parents are increasingly aware of the importance of education in general and of girls in particular nowadays. We noticed a lower school drop-out rate in school. Thanks to Save the Children, schools receive hygiene kits and school supplies to help children to get a quality education and remain healthy.”

Natene is happy to share her health and hygiene lessons with her family members too, further widening the impact sponsors have made in Finkolo. Simple lessons like how to wash one’s hands help reduce disease and school drop-out rates and likewise increase class attendance and learning abilities as children can learn more when they are in good health.

Interested in joining our community of sponsors? Click here to learn more.

A Sponsor’s Visit, Through the Eyes of a Child

Rosmery Mendoza Villca

Sponsorship Operations Assistant

Save the Children in Bolivia

July 25, 2018

“I never thought my dream would come true,” says 11-year-old Jennifer, after sharing with us the amazing experience of getting to know her sponsor in person. Over the past year and a half, she and her sponsor had grown a friendship with each letter they wrote to each other. However, Jennifer never expected they would be able to meet face-to-face.

Jennifer received news from sponsorship staff that her sponsor, Yu, would be coming to visit her – all the way from China! She eagerly waited to be able to finally hug her and let her know how grateful she is for all of her support.

Jennifer and Yu during her welcome ceremony.

Jennifer also wanted to tell Yu that her school improved a lot since Save the Children started working there, it became a place where teachers implement new teaching styles that make school fun and exciting. In this part of Bolivia, teachers used to carry out more traditional teaching methods, such as rote memorization, that weren’t appealing to students and made school feel boring and uninteresting. However since sponsorship began showing teachers a new way, classes at Jennifer’s school started to be more centered around children, incorporating games, stories, and theater to keep students engaged.

The awaited day finally arrived! And as soon as Jennifer was able to see Yu, the emotion and excitement was so great for both of them that neither were able to hold back their tears.

Yu was received at Jennifer´s school with great fanfare. Children, teachers, and parents numbering over 150 people gave her an emotional welcome. Children carried flags, welcome signs and threw flower petals to Yu while the school band played. Jennifer placed a flower garland on Yu’s neck and then took her hand and led her into the school, where they talked, played games and learned more about each other for the rest of the afternoon.

Jennifer showing the photo album she made of Yu’s visit.

As a reminder of that wonderful day, Jennifer created a photo album of her time with Yu. “This will be my greatest treasure” she says, while she proudly shows us her photos. She loves remembering every moment of this visit, her sponsor’s embrace and all the time she spent with Yu, and fondly flips through the photo album when she wants to recall those feelings of excitement and joy.

This is a memorable experience that not many can experience. The joy and emotion a child experiences by having a faraway friend travel thousands of miles to see them leaves traces that will never be erased in their hearts. Did you know you can visit your sponsored child? Contact our team in Fairfield, CT at ChildVisits@SaveChildren.org to learn more!

Interested in joining our community of sponsors? Click here to learn more.

My New Friend, Arouna

Written by Victoria Zegler, Sponsorship Storyteller

It’s been almost two years now that I have been working with Save the Children – traveling to eleven different countries and a multitude of communities to document firsthand, through photo and video, the positive impact being made by sponsors. During my recent trip to Mali, I had the opportunity to visit a very special village, one that is just beginning to see the impact being made by Save the Children. Why was it so special, you ask? Because, in my opinion, the beauty of a community lies within the people.

My first impression upon entering the small village was of a young boy standing across from me. He was wearing an oversized bright orange sweatshirt, and he was smiling at me.

I smiled back, and he giggled.

13-year-old Arouna, left, and his 14-year-old brother Mamarou, center, learn from Sponsorship Storyteller Victoria, how to record a video during a visit to the community.

Naturally, I took an immediate liking to him because, as an outsider visiting remote locations, a child’s initial reaction to my presence is usually to shy away. After exchanging pleasantries with the school headmaster and teachers, which is a common courtesy in Mali, I had time to meet with some of the sponsored children and ask them to share their stories with me.

As I began writing down interview questions in my notebook, I heard voices entering the classroom. As I looked up, there he was! The boy in the orange sweatshirt. I learned his name was Arouna and he was with his mother, Matou. After introducing myself to both, I began the interview with introductory questions, to get to know Arouna and the small village he calls home.

At one point, I asked Arouna, “What is your favorite thing about sponsorship?”

He replied, “Getting my photo taken, because it means I have a chance at making a new friend.”

It was at that moment I knew I wanted to be one of Arouna’s new friends. There was something about him – he seemed so very special.

During our interview, I learned that Arouna is 13 years old and in sixth grade. His father passed away last year leaving the family with very little to survive. Arouna’s sisters went to stay with other family members and his older brother Mamarou, who is only one year older than Arouna, dropped out of school to work in the cotton fields, to provide food for their family.

Now, Arouna is the only child in his family who is attending school.

Following the interview, I was able to capture moments of Arouna learning in the classroom, playing with friends and spending time with his family. Over the course of the two days I spent in his small village, Arouna and I created our own handshake, learned some English words together like ‘book,’ and he even helped me operate my camera! Although we weren’t able to verbally communicate without a translator, we formed a bond. I was so deeply touched by Arouna’s story and his family’s hardship. I felt a strong desire to tell him that I believed in him. I was afraid that if Arouna’s family continued to struggle, that his fate would end up the same as his brothers.

13-year-old Arouna, left, and his 14-year-old brother Mamarou, right, share a laugh inside of the community school which Arouna attends.

Before I left Arouna’s community, I gave him a red leather-bound notebook to take to school. On the inside cover of the book I wrote him a note in his local language, Bambara.

It read:

Arouna, 

Never give up on your dreams.

You can achieve anything you put your mind to.

Best of luck to you in your future. 

Your friend,

Victoria

As a sponsor, it is important for me to let children know that they have someone on the other end of the world who believes in them. As sponsors, we provide hope and inspiration to so many children like Arouna. These words are something they will cherish for a lifetime, allowing them to believe in themselves and succeed.

Reading for All Children

Author Portrait_Memory Mwathengere, Sponsorship Communications Coordinator
Memory Mwathengere

Sponsorship Communications Coordinator

Save the Children in Malawi

June 23, 2018

Reading is a critical skill to learn, and one that enables all future learning – children must learn to read so they are able to learn. However, reading is also a skill where many children can quickly fall behind, especially those with learning disabilities. How then can children with learning difficulties be supported?

Save the Children in Malawi is working to address this problem through an education program we call the Special Needs Action Pack, or SNAP. Since 2008, we’ve been working with children, teachers and community members to strengthen literacy skills of children in Zomba, for example through efforts that improve access to books and introduce child-centered teaching methods in classrooms that use games, songs and play to help children learn to their fullest potential. Last year, we started working to redesign those programs to ensure they are truly all-inclusive, most importantly for learners who were not fully benefiting yet due to their diverse learning needs.

Modester in her classroom in Zomba, with one of her students.
Modester in her classroom in Zomba, with one of her students.

Through SNAP, we help ensure quality and equitable education to every child, regardless of his or her physical, mental or emotional status. SNAP explained simply is a set of tools designed to equip teachers with skills on how they can identify and effectively support learners with special needs, and ensure those struggling to read in class improve their reading abilities. Save the Children also works hand-in-hand with the district’s Ministry of Education office, to ensure local partners are involved in ownership of programs for children.

Modester is a 6th grade teacher who has benefited greatly from the SNAP trainings. Before the trainings, Modester faced numerous difficulties in teaching special needs children – she handled all the students in her classroom as though they had the same abilities. She did not realize the importance of treating children as individuals with different abilities to learn, and as a result, learners who were slow to grasp were missing out on her lessons.

Through lessons learned in the trainings she participated in as a part of SNAP, Modester is now able to identify and employ effective strategies of supporting all her students. Strategies include how to better plan lessons to accommodate individual learning and needs. Learning and assessment materials are also provided, and general knowledge on how teachers can ably accommodate all learners in their lessons. Modester also learned how to create learning materials using low-cost and locally available resources, for example, how to create raised prints for learners with visual challenges by hand.

“SNAP is an effective program. It has helped improve my relationship with children with learning disabilities as I have gained skills on how to involve them in all classroom activities. They are able to open-up to me whenever they have challenges. Similarly, parents of these children are now able to open-up regarding the challenges faced by their children, which they were unable to share in the past.”

Previously, discussing issues like children’s disabilities openly with parents was not culturally accepted, however Modester has learned how to bring up these topics with families in a sensitive and respectful way. She shared there is improved performance by her students as well. “The performance of learners in my class has greatly improved and I foresee more improvements.”

Modester, a 6th grade teacher who has benefited greatly from sponsorship trainings.
Modester, a 6th grade teacher who has benefited greatly from sponsorship trainings.

SNAP training sessions have been conducted in 30 sponsorship schools and through these sessions, teachers are able to use these skills to help children with learning difficulties in other learning areas besides reading, such as in mathematics. School attendance is up in these schools, and overall now all students can be seen participating in class activities, rather than just a few.

“I am proud and thankful to Save the Children. I would not have acquired these skills without them, and the Ministry of Education would not have done this alone. Such innovations are very imperative”, concluded Modester.

Interested in joining our community of sponsors? Click here to learn more.

Sponsorship Helps Mali Father Follow his Passion to Help More Children

Save the Children in Mali

Abdoulaye is a passionate teacher, engaged father and proud sponsorship graduate in Mali. He became a sponsored child when he was 10 years old and his sponsor’s letters inspired him to work hard in school. “If I had not participated in the sponsorship program, I would not have gone to school and my life would be different than today,” he says. He still keeps a picture of his Save the Children sponsor, which reminds him of how his life has changed for the better.

Before sponsorship entered his community, Abdoulaye sporadically attended school, mainly because his parents didn’t understand the value of an education. Children in his community were sick with intestinal worms and anemia, which also prevented them from going to class. When sponsorship moved into Abdoulaye’s community, his parents learned how essential a quality education was to a child’s future success. Abdoulaye started attending school regularly where he received school supplies and deworming treatments, which helped start him on a path to success.

Now, Abdoulaye is a teacher, passing on his love of learning to the children in his classroom. As a father, Abdoulaye dreams for his own children to have bright futures filled with opportunity. Thanks to sponsorship, Abdoulaye is a very active father in his children’s lives, helping them with their schooling and encouraging them to do their best. Abdoulaye is working hard to make sure they get a good education, and is saving money so that he can go back to school and work in the education ministry.

Thanks to support from our child sponsors, Abdoulaye saw first-hand the value of an education. By working for the education ministry, he will soon be able to enact even more change for the children of Mali.