what happens to children after a hurricane

Life After a Hurricane: How Save the Children Supports Children and Families During Disasters and their Aftermath

Before Hurricane Florence hit, save the Children deployed our emergency response team and pre-positioned essential child-focused supplies designed to help vulnerable children during disasters and their aftermath. Our teams are committed to supporting the children and families in their long-term recovery, as the emotional distress of evacuating home and being out of school can take its toll on children. 

As the roads in North Carolina re-open after Hurricane Florence, our humanitarian relief experts continue to assess the storm’s impact on children and provide assistance to those in shelters – even reaching New Bern which saw record flooding. We continue to work tirelessly to address the needs of thousands of families who were forced to evacuate their homes, fearing the worst.

In post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans in 2005, Save the Children developed Journey of Hope, a child-informed program that draws on children’s strengths to support their resilience. Journey of Hope has helped thousands of children and their caregivers affected by the 2017 hurricanes in Texas, Florida and Puerto Rico cope with loss, fear and stress. Here is the story of one such family. 

After Hurricane Harvey, fifty-four counties in Texas were declared a state of disaster. Rainfall was measured in feet. Two more devastating U.S. hurricanes would follow, all within a month of one another. Each of them leaving children and families reeling. Families like Alexia and her son DeAndre. 

As Hurricane Harvey flooded Houston, Alexia and her 10-year-old son, DeAndre, watched the water levels rise and cover the floors in their apartment. When the bathroom ceiling caved in, Alexia knew they needed to go, but she worried about her son being stuck in a shelter without the space to be a kid.

At the shelter, Alexia brought DeAndre to our child-friendly space, where he soon made friends, played games, created art and went on field trips. Alexia says this allowed him to disconnect from the stress of the storm and gave her peace of mind knowing that he was safe and happy. Our staff stood by Alexia as she made arrangements to get out of the shelter and helped her ask the right questions to ensure they weren’t forgotten.

And one year post-Harvey, DeAndre unlocks the door to their new, fully furnished apartment. He has his own room and a playground around the corner. “If it wasn’t for Save the Children, we wouldn’t be in an apartment. We would probably be either moved around to a different place from the shelter or we would be out on the street,” says Alexia.

With your support, 261,170 children and adults from the Texas coast to the greater Houston area have directly or indirectly benefited from our relief and recovery programs.1  Additionally, nearly 39,000 children and adults from the Florida Keys to Jacksonville impacted by Hurricane Irma have directly and indirectly benefited from Save the Children-supported programs made possible through the generosity of our donors.2  In Puerto Rico, more than 116,000 children and adults have benefited from our Hurricane Maria relief and recovery programs.3 

Today, more than 1 million people in coastal areas of Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina have been ordered to evacuate their homes as Hurricane Florence pounds the coast. How many children and families will watch the water levels rise and cover the floors the way Alexia and DeAndre did when a hurricane struck their home? 

Save the Children needs your generous gift to help protect vulnerable children and provide desperately needed relief to families.

DONATE NOW TO THE HURRICANE FLORENCE CHILDREN’S RELIEF FUND

 

1. Hurricane Harvey: One-Year Report 

2. Hurricane Irma: One-Year Report 

3. Hurricane Maria: One-Year Report 

The Irrevocable Harm of Indefinite Detention of Immigrant and Refugee Children  

This post originally posted by Save the Children Action Network.
Written by Megan McKenna, Senior Director of Communications and Community Engagement at KIND

Kids in Need of Defense (KIND) provides legal support services to unaccompanied and separated children, working to ensure that no child appears in immigration court without high quality legal representation. Earlier this summer, Save the Children initiated a partnership with KIND to support their critical work serving children and families at the U.S.-Mexico border.  

harm of indefinite detention on immigrant refugee children

“Please don’t forget about us.”
-Unaccompanied child held in custody in California

The prolonged and indefinite detention of immigrant and refugee children in detention facilities – which the Trump Administration is proposing in new regulations – is without question an attack on the core values of the United States and will fundamentally change the way the U.S. treats vulnerable children.

The detention of children – regardless of the conditions – harms them in the short and long-term in profound ways. Studies have found that immigrant children held in detention are more likely to suffer from depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, development delays, and attention deficit disorder. How deeply children are affected and the long-term impact depends on a variety of factors such as the age of the child, the trauma the child experienced previously, how long the child was held and under what conditions, and the child’s situation in relation to the child’s parent or caregiver.

In the best of circumstances, immigrant and refugee children have a difficult time understanding even the basics of the U.S. immigration system as they are new to the United States and know little to nothing about U.S. systems, law, or processes. They most likely do not speak English. They are scared of people in uniform, terrified that they will be sent back to the very harm they fled and carry a tremendous amount of uncertainty for their future.  

As a KIND beneficiary in Los Angeles said, “I was all alone. I was scared and I didn’t know what would happen to me. I didn’t understand the guards and that made them angry.”

Prolonged detention compounds any trauma immigrant and refugee children suffered in their home country that caused them to flee, or on the life-threatening journey to the United States. Most KIND clients have been traumatized in some way, many as a result of gang violence, including sexual and gender-based violence in their home country. These root causes of migration and the deeply personal emotional scarring they cause can become secondary to the damaging emotional and psychological impact of prolonged detention, thus impairing a child’s ability to make a case for U.S. protection.

Detention of children is unnecessary. Alternatives to detention have been used in the past and been very successful.

The findings of two doctors within the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS)’s Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, which has investigated DHS facilities, perhaps say it best. They wrote in a July 2018 letter to Congress, “In our professional opinion, there is no amount of programming that can ameliorate the harms created by the very act of confining children to detention centers. Detention of innocent children should never occur in a civilized society, especially if there are less restrictive options, because the risk of harm to children simply cannot be justified.”

Or, as a girl described during her time in detention, “[The officer] told me to stop crying….I tried, but I couldn’t stop.”

To learn more about how Save the Children is providing direct assistance to migrant children and their families, visit our website.

YOUR SUPPORT CAN MAKE THE DIFFERENCE FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES IN NEED. MAKE A DONATION TODAY!

Typhoon Mangkhut approaches Philippines

The Philippines Braces for Super Typhoon Mangkhut: 3 Things You Need to Know

The Philippines is prone to deadly natural disasters

Typhoon Haiyan made landfall in the Philippines on November 8, 2013. It was one of the most powerful storms ever recorded, killing 6,000 people and leaving millions homeless.1   

With vivid memories of the havoc wreaked just over a year ago, Typhoon Hagupit struck the Philippines in 2014. While Hagupit roared in from the Pacific as a Category 3 typhoon, it did not prove as deadly as Haiyan. 

The two years after Typhoon Hagupit brought with them additional storms. Typhoon Koppu in 2015 and Typhoon Haima in 2016. 

Save the Children responded to all four typhoons, supporting the rebuilding of homes and livelihoods of over 1 million people, including 826,000 children.

Super Typhoon Mangkhut could be a category 4 storm

While the slow moving typhoon strengthened to category 5 status on Wednesday, with sustained winds of up to about 180 miles per hour, current modelling has the storm making landfall as a category 4 typhoon on Saturday morning. Super Typhoon Mangkhut looks set to pummel coastal communities in the Filipino island of Luzon, the country’s most populous island and home nation’s capitol of Manila. 

In 2016, Typhoon Haima weakened from a category 5 storm to category 4 just before making landfall, tens of thousands of homes and displacing more than 90,000 people in Luzon.

Millions of children are at risk

Heavy rains, flooding and landslides could put million of already vulnerable children at risk.

Save the Children has emergency team deployed to Santiago, Luzon with pre-position relief items positioned across the country, including thousands of household, hygiene and back-to-school kits. 

“We are hoping for the best but preparing for the worst, Save the Children Philippines CEO Alberto Muyot said. “Once the storm passes, our team will work with local authorities and other aid agencies to assess the scale of devastation caused by the typhoon and determine what the needs are of those affected.” 

 

1. Save the Children 

My Journey of Hope – One Year After Hurricane Maria

One year after Hurricane Maria

Written by Angelica Cadavid | Photograph by Gary Shaye

When I arrived in Puerto Rico, I didn’t know what to expect. Almost a year after Hurricane Maria, I wondered what I would see. Would my mother’s beloved island still show the scars of the devastation that roared upon its shores on September 20, 2017? What about the children?

What I saw was heartbreaking and hopeful at the same time. The physical signs of Hurricane Maria were everywhere. I kept telling my non-Puerto Rico based colleagues that the island didn’t look like this before the storm. Everywhere were the markers of what were once family homes and local businesses, now in ruins. One girl I spoke with told me the hurricane blew the roof off her home. What was equally traumatic for her family was finding the remnants of other people’s lives that the storm had blown into their house, things like shoes and other personal items.

While many of the children and families that I spoke with painted a picture of loss, our conversations also turned hopeful. Communities like Fronton and Mulitas were coming together to support one another, especially the children. An abandoned basketball court is now a beautiful community center. It’s a place where children can play in a safe, protected environment, make up for lost school days, and heal from the trauma of loss and fear caused by the storm.  One young boy told me he was afraid and angry after the hurricane but now he feels protected after participating in our Journey of Hope program.

Families told me how much the programs meant to them, but until I saw our community activities in action, I had no idea. I wish every Save the Children supporter could see the joy on the children’s faces. Even those kids that had started the day a bit sullen were soon laughing and playing. 

Almost one year after Hurricane Maria, there is still so much need on the island. It took 10 months for the community of Mariana to get electricity. But Puerto Ricans are resilient and with help and the continued dedication of Save the Children staff, local leaders, parents and supporters – Puerto Rico si se levanta (Puerto Rico will rise up).

To learn more about Save the Children’s emergency responses and ongoing recovery work in Puerto Rico, visit our website.

YOUR SUPPORT CAN MAKE THE DIFFERENCE FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES IN NEED. MAKE A DONATION TO THE HURRICANE MARIA CHILDREN’S RELIEF FUND TODAY!

 

Preparing for Hurricane Florence

More than 1 million people in coastal areas of Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina have been ordered to evacuate their homes as Hurricane Florence, anticipated to be a Category 5 storm by the time it makes landfall, continues towards shore. 

All along the coast, concerned residents are taking necessary emergency preparedness precautions and springing into action – boarding up their homes, filling their fuel tanks with gas and heading towards safety. However, families with young children need take additional steps around hurricane preparedness, including providing children with understanding and control around the emergency. As the national leader for children in emergencies, Save the Children is here to help. 

Talk about Hurricane Florence
Preparing young children for a hurricane emergency can start with letting them know that it’s alright to be afraid in disaster situations. Explain to your child what may happen once Hurricane Florence makes landfall using simple, age-appropriate words. Reassure your children that during Hurricane Florence, many caring adults — including parents, teachers and first responders — will be working to keep them safe. 

Identify Evacuation Routes
If you are among the 1 million people ordered to evacuate the coastal areas in Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina, reassure your children that you have identified the best evacuation routes and review the route together. 

Pack an Emergency Go-To Bag
The process of putting together an emergency go-to bag will help children understand what could happen during and after Hurricane Florence. For example, a flash light and non-perishable food are essential emergency go-to bag items that will come in handy should the power go out. A few favorite toys, medicine and personal hygiene items are also important to have in an emergency go-to bag should your family be away from home for a few days or more. 

Make Emergency Contact Cards
Every child in your family should have an emergency contact card that includes three emergency contacts any first responder or caregiver can reach out to, in case your family is separated during the Hurricane Florence. Save the Children has an easy tool that allows families to create an Emergency Contact Card together.

Save the Children is closely monitoring Hurricane Florence and is assembling a team in North Carolina to help children and families bracing for the powerful storm. With your support, our caring professionals are prepared to help vulnerable children during and after the storm. 

 

To learn more about Save the Children’s emergency responses and ongoing recovery work, visit our website.

YOUR SUPPORT CAN MAKE THE DIFFERENCE. MAKE A DONATION TODAY TO SUPPORT THE HURRICANE FLORENCE CHILDREN’S EMERGENCY RELIEF FUND.

Strengthening Community through Vroom

Written by Sandra Anthony, Save the Children Ambassador, Marion County School District, Mississippi

Alone, we can do so little; together, we can do so much – Helen Keller

For me, “community” is rooted in fellowship with others as a result of sharing common attitudes, interests and goals. One of the most important obligations of a community is to make sure that its children have a chance at a successful future. Protecting vulnerable young members of the community who do not have a voice – from neglect, poverty, abuse and violence – is essential. It is also the community’s responsibility to promote education.

When I became community and kindergarten readiness ambassador for Vroom, an initiative of the Bezos Family Foundation, my eyes were opened to the need for more educational development in our small, rural community of Foxworth, Mississippi. We did not have the resources for parents to support their children’s learning outside of school and the closest library is 30 miles away. Many families lack transportation. I knew there had to be a way to inform parents how important it is to educate young children at home before entering kindergarten. Yet, for families living in poverty, parents often wake up in survival mode and stressed about whether they can pay the electric bill or stretch the food supply. As a result, I found that many parents were forgetting to take an active part in the education of their children.

The arrival of Vroom transformed our community.

With the help of Vroom tips, I was able to connect with local businesses and churches in the community and demonstrate how they could support early child education. To reach a broader area, I set up a social media Vroom page highlighting how easy it is to incorporate Vroom into everyday activities. I literally saw the community begin to light up! I began to receive feedback from parents on how they incorporated Vroom into small daily tasks like cleaning, bathing and riding in a car. Understanding the need for these resources, stores allowed me to put up posters and flyers. I created Vroom placemats for restaurants to pass out to families waiting for their meals so they were able to have a literacy experience together. Three churches allowed me to come speak about Vroom. During these events, I would have Vroom pamphlets, posters, tip cards, shirts, keychains and books to distribute. At the community’s fall festival event, children were able to pick pumpkins with tips attached to them. As the word spread, people would actually stop me as I walked down the street or call and say that they had seen my posters and wanted to know more about the five basics of Vroom (Look, Chat, Follow, Stretch, and Take Turns).

It was during these conversations that I met Katheryn Lowery and her daughter, Abby Raye (at left). Mrs. Lowery stated that she was 36 when she found out she was expecting. She was not familiar with Vroom techniques and did not believe she had the skills to teach her daughter. What an opportunity, to share with her that she already had what it takes to be a brain builder. Now when I see her, Katheryn tells me how much she loves Vroom tips and how she is better equipped as a parent to support and identify appropriate development milestones for Abby Raye.

Enthusiasm for Vroom throughout the community has continued to grow, and local leaders, businesses and churches have become Vroom partners. At a local collaborative meeting, I gave community leaders the opportunity to try Vroom tips out themselves. Mark Rogers, a local journalist, and Chief Deputy Sheriff Jamie Singley couldn’t hold back their laughter as they practice the “Smile and Wink” activity. By taking part in actual Vroom activities, community leaders experienced the actual effect of the Vroom tips versus just listening to the benefits that they offer. After the meeting, these leaders went out and continued to spread the word about the importance of early learning for children.

Vroom has strengthened our community in many ways. Law enforcement personnel share Vroom tips and books with children during security checkpoints. Medical clinics display Vroom posters and books in waiting rooms and the local custard stand gives out information at their drive-through window. Child protective services has mandated that parents who have had their children taken away attend the Vroom Play & Learn groups to increase their knowledge of early literacy to help them regain custody of their children. The local newspaper publishes articles highlighting the importance of Vroom for early development and local radio station invited me on air to emphasize the benefits of Vroom.

Without the support of community and the Vroom initiative, it would have been impossible for me to reach out to the families in Marion County and share strategies to help children learn early. However, with community support, the children entering kindergarten this year in Marion County are much better prepared for success. Helen Keller was right; alone we can do so little, together we can do so much more.

 

To learn more about how Vroom is innovating Save the Children’s Early Steps to School Success program, visit our website.

 

When You Meet Your Other Family


By Agus, Edited by Suciati Bobu

Sponsorship Operations Staff

Save the Children in Indonesia

September 6, 2018

On February 13th, 2017, I was spending time with my friends playing around our home, when my teacher came to visit. As I approached wondering what news the teacher had brought in to my parents, I was called, “Agus, please come in! I’ve got something to tell you!” The teacher waved me to come closer, “You know what, you are going to have your sponsor visit you soon,” she told me. “Your parents are okay with the visit. What do you think?”

I thought, “Wow, there is a foreigner coming to visit me! Is it true? Is there someone who wants to come a long way to visit me in my village?”

I live in a small farming village in the mountains on an island, where it is very rare to receive visits from outsiders, even from the little town here. Expecting a foreigner to visit me was beyond my imagination. As a school ambassador of Save the Children, I have a sponsor in Korea whose name is Mr. Choi. We write to each other through letters. Is this Korean man sure he would like to come to see me? Questions boomed in my head.

Agus writing a letter to his sponsor, Mr. Choi.

“Yes!” I gave my short answer with a big nod. It was a ‘yes’ with a mix of wonder, many questions and of course, excitement.

Time flew by and it came the day of the visit, the 5th of May, 2017. My parents came along to school to meet Mr. Choi and his family. I was excited about meeting them. “What will they look like?” I saw a group of people stepping out of the car. I could see four beautiful people who looked different from the others. They were Mr. Choi, his wife, and their son and daughter – Wonho who was 5 and little Yunji who was just 3. The other two were Save the Children staff who helped facilitate the meeting. “They are here, it’s unbelievable!” I thought to myself.

When it came to the introduction part, I was so nervous. I did not know what to say to Mr. Choi and his family. I had no clue how to speak Korean, even English. Luckily, the people from Save the Children helped me. It was surprising to know that Mr. Choi still remembered my dream of becoming a pilot. I recalled that I once mentioned it when I wrote a letter to him. He knew and remembered that about me, and much more through the letters I sent. He told me how keen they were to visit me. I felt so special.

Agus’s family and Mr. Choi’s family meet up at school.

We then walked together to see the other students. As Mr. Choi is a dentist, he brought hundreds of toothbrushes. We shared them with the other students at school. In class, we learn about how to have good personal hygiene and nutrition, and learn about how and when to brush our teeth, too. Just like Mr. Choi does at his job!

Before leaving, Mr. Choi came to me and said, “I’ll try to come back. Please study hard to reach your dream. Go to school every day and obey your parents!” It was just a few of hours meeting, but seeing them leaving was heart breaking. Yet, I know that we would still communicate through letters. Most of all, I am now confident in studying even harder in order to pursue my dream.

I know that I have my other family in another part of the world who always supports me.

Have you written to your sponsored child lately? A quick note with a few words of encouragement can make a world of difference for a struggling child. Consider sharing a message with them today!

Interested in joining our community of sponsors? Click here to learn more.

 

Every Last Child Deserves the Opportunity to Learn to Read

Across the world, millions of children leave school without learning to properly read and write. Angelita, age 9, was at risk of becoming one such child. Although she was enrolled in a primary school in her rural Indonesian village, Angelita was a struggling student. 

If a young child gap struggles with reading, they risk falling behind and may never catch up. In fact, if children don’t get the help they need to learn to read, then the gaps between struggling and strong readers widens and worsen as they grow. 

As a young girl growing up in a place that grapples with widespread poverty and political instability, Angelita is one of 575 million girls who live in countries characterized by discrimination against girls.1  As reported in Save the Children’s 2018 End of Childhood Report, girls are more likely than boys to never set foot in a classroom. At last estimate, some 15 million girls of primary school age would never get the chance to learn to read or write in primary school. And for those girls who are enrolled in school, the opportunity to develop as a reader is not guaranteed. In fact, only 94% of girls 15 and older are literate.

Save the Children supports child literacy around the world.
Angelita attends a Save the Children ‘reading camp’, a program that aims to boost literacy rates, at a Save the Children-funded model primary school in West Sumba, Indonesia.

Save the Children has worked in Indonesia for more than three decades.  Thanks to the generous support of our sponsors, enrollment for girls in sponsorship schools rose by nearly 5% over 2015. 

With your support, we are working to give children in Indonesia and around the world early learning opportunities at home and in school. 

For just over a year now, 9-year-old Angelita has been taking part in a Save the Children ‘reading camp’ – a vital afterschool program that boosts the literacy of 7 through 9-year-olds and gives them the skills to succeed, even when learning in overburdened school systems.

“Personally, I think children here lacked many things before Save the Children came,” says Angelita’s mother Maria. “Now, we can see our children have had significant improvements in their education. They’re more keen on going to school.” 

To learn more about Save the Children’s work to support child literacy around the world, visit our website.

YOUR SUPPORT CAN MAKE THE DIFFERENCE FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES IN NEED. MAKE A DONATION TODAY!

 
 

1. 2018 End of Childhood Report 

child literacy facts for parents

Child Literacy Facts for Parents

Literacy opens the door to a brighter future. A child’s early years are critical in shaping their development and lifelong learning potential. However, if a young child struggles with reading, they risk falling behind and may never catch up. In fact, if children don’t get the help they need to learn to read, then the gaps between struggling and strong readers widen and worsen as they grow.

Poet and author Emilie Buchwald wrote, “Children are made readers on the laps of their parents.” But for children living in poverty, and those with few books or no one to read to them at home, the chance to become a lifelong reader may seem out of reach. In fact, children in poverty are less likely to attend preschool and often live in households where early learning activities are few and far between.

That’s why Save the Children’s education experts support children, parents, caregivers and schools to develop literacy skills from birth. There are many things you can do to support child literacy as well, and ways you can get the children in your life reading and succeeding, as a result.

child literacy facts for parents

Statistics about Reading and Success

According to the Department of Education, the more students read or are read to for fun on their own time and at home, the higher their reading scores, generally.1  However, in the United States, more than 60% of low-income families have no children’s books in their home.2 

In many rural communities where Save the Children works, the school library is the only place where children can access books. When children don’t have access to books or have family members regularly read aloud to them, their reading scores dive far below the national average. By the time they’re 3 years old, children from low-income families have been exposed to 30 million fewer words than their more affluent counterparts.3  Reading and being read aloud to has an impact that extends beyond just hearing stories.

When children are read to at home, they are able to count to 20 or higher, write their own names, and over 1 out of 4 of those children are able to recognize all members of the alphabet.4  Children who read at home also score higher in math.

What is the best way to teach a child to read?

The first step on the path to literacy is teaching children letters and the sounds they make. You can read along with a child to help them identify and sound-out the different noises in a word. As children take these precious first steps towards literacy, parents should gradually expand their selection of reading material to help children learn new words.

Children need to learn to read accurately and with understanding. The best way to teach a child to do that is to ask them questions and encourage them to think carefully about the words. As anyone who has learned a second language can tell you, learning these skills once is not enough. Children need to develop fluency, which only comes from practice.

child literacy facts for parents

How can I improve my child’s reading skills?

Nearly every parent has asked themselves, “How do I help my child read at home?” Let’s reframe that question. Instead, think of how you can make reading more enjoyable for your child.

It can be a big mistake to turn reading into a power struggle, or to unintentionally train children to see reading as something done just for a reward instead of for enjoyment. Kids like to read when it’s fun and when it’s relevant to their interests.

Parents will notice their children are full of questions. If your child shows curiosity about a specific topic, visit the library or bookstore and get them a book on the subject. If they have a favorite TV or movie character, see if there are a line of books that continue that character’s adventures on the printed page. In addition to wanting to read more, your child will also expand his or her imagination.

At what age should a child be able to read?

Although every child is different, most children are able to read between the ages of 4 and 7. Some children start learning to read and write their letters, or recognize signs and symbols as early as 3 years old. Gradually, their reading proficiency grows and they start to ask questions about words they can’t sound out or do not understand. While some children are slower to develop reading skills, most should be able to read with fluency by the time they’re 7 years old.

However, children who do not develop literacy skills early-on can face serious disadvantages in the classroom. When a child’s reading skills are not in-step with the timetable for their school, those children fall behind. Poor reading skills may not only affect their grades, but also take a toll on their confidence or create educational problems in other areas.

How can I help my Dyslexic child learn to read?

Dyslexia is a disorder that affects children of all ages and learning levels — even children with above average intelligence. Dyslexia is a learning disorder that affects the way the brain processes information. For children with dyslexia, certain parts of their brains process words on a page differently than most people, which makes reading much harder for them. Dyslexia is typically diagnosed during pre-school or elementary school years.

Dyslexia can be overcome. Kids with dyslexia can work with a teacher, tutor, specialist, or their parents to improve their reading. In particular, dyslexic children need extra help memorizing sight words. Parents can help by trying to engage all of their child’s senses when learning something new. For example, if a child is struggling to remember a letter, encourage them to use their finger to trace-out the shape of the letter.

Repetition is also important to helping dyslexic children overcome their challenges. Similarly, talking about what they read and/or heard can help them better understand what they’ve read and increase comprehension skills.

Helping Children in Need

“Here’s the good news,” stated Save the Children Trustee Jennifer Garner when testifying on Capitol Hill about the importance of early childhood education in March 2017. “It takes so little – a ball, a book, a parent who is given the encouragement to read or talk or sing to a child – to make a life-changing difference.”

Supporting Save the Children’s literacy programs ensures that children in the U.S. and around the world will be introduced to reading and writing at a young age, and that they will be given the opportunity to reach their full potential.

To learn more about the work Save the Children has done to support child literacy and help set children up for success, visit our website.

YOUR SUPPORT CAN MAKE THE DIFFERENCE FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES IN NEED. MAKE A DONATION TODAY!

 

1. Facts About Children’s Literacy 

2. Beyond School Walls: A Boost for Readers 

3. Hart, Betty and Todd R. Risley. “The Early Catastrophe: The 30 Million Word Gap by Age 3.” American Educator, Spring 2003. 6 Isaacs, Julia B. and Katherine Magnuson.  

4. Facts About Children’s Literacy 

Use Your Voice to Help Even More Children: Donate to Save the Children with Amazon Alexa

Giving is now as easy as saying “Alexa, donate to Save the Children.” We know our supporters like you have busy lives. Now with Alexa and Amazon Pay, it’s even quicker and easier for you to make a difference for kids in need.

Thanks to our donors’ generosity, Save the Children has a long history of innovation in our work helping the world’s most vulnerable girls and boys. This pioneering spirit also inspires us to look for ways we can be more efficient and effective. Because of this, we’re thrilled to offer donors an easy way to help children through Amazon Alexa. As voice technology becomes more and more popular, we want to make sure it’s as easy as possible for our supporters to help children around the world.

“With Alexa voice donations, you can literally use your voice to help even more children in need by donating to Save the Children,” stated Ettore Rossetti, Sr. Advisor of Social Strategy & Digital Innovation.

This isn’t the first time we were first-movers in new ways for charitable giving. As an early adopter of PayPal, Bitcoin, G2A Pay Wallet, YouTube donate cards, Facebook donate buttons, Apple Pay and Venmo, we continue to look provide a variety of secure and easy ways you can give to our mission.

When you make a donation on Alexa by using Amazon Pay, the information already stored in your Amazon account is used. No fumbling with credit card numbers or filling our long forms. And, you’ll have peace of mind knowing your payment information remains safe and secure.

To donate to Save the Children using Amazon Pay, visit: https://files.savethechildren.org/amazon-pay/